Best Food Plot for Wet Ground

Discussion in 'Whitetail Management' started by Sligh1, Mar 17, 2008.

  1. Sligh1

    Sligh1 Well-Known Member

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    Have an acre that floods out 1 or 2 times a year depending on how much rain. I know clover does better than alf-alfa on wet ground. Beans will die. What's some really good options for poorly drained soil?!?!!? Will clover die if water sits on it for a few days???
     
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  3. Osenbaugh

    Osenbaugh New Member

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    Location:
    Lucas Iowa
    Whitetail Institute has Chicory Plus
    Chicory Plus is an Excellent perennial for areas with slightly well drained to heavy soils that hold moisture.Chicory plus has imperial clover which is another that would with stand poorly drained soil.When seeding 7lbs to the acre.

    Osenbaughs Prairie Seed Farms
    Nathan Pace-Sales Consultant
    nate@prairieseedfarms.com
    1-800-582-2788
     
  4. FarmlandQDM

    FarmlandQDM New Member

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    If flooding is an annual problem you might consider planting it to swamp white oak and pin oak. This may be a better long term use for the site.
     
  5. nannyslayer

    nannyslayer New Member

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    Sligh1, you can actually look at alfalfa. I was in a forage meeting all day and learned alot about different types of forages.

    There is a aqua alfalfa that has been around a year or two. It really doens't grow in water, just the name they came up with for it being very tolerant of "wet feet" and very poor drained soils. From all of the info that I have on it, it can withstand a flood or two, as long as the water doesn't sit on it for a week or two. PM me if you are interested in more information on it. I can email you the literature that I have on it.
     
  6. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: nannyslayer</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Sligh1, you can actually look at alfalfa. I was in a forage meeting all day and learned alot about different types of forages.

    There is a aqua alfalfa that has been around a year or two. It really doens't grow in water, just the name they came up with for it being very tolerant of "wet feet" and very poor drained soils. From all of the info that I have on it, it can withstand a flood or two, as long as the water doesn't sit on it for a week or two. PM me if you are interested in more information on it. I can email you the literature that I have on it. </div></div>

    Send me some info Nanny and I'll add it to our Alfalfa thread.

    Sounds interesting! /forum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/cool.gif
     
  7. TallTines

    TallTines New Member

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    I believe that alsike clover would be the clover that you want.

    I have not personally used it but here is what it says off the welter seed website about it.

    "Alsike Clover

    Alsike Clover is a short-lived perennial that does well on low, poorly drained acid soil.

    Alsike Clover is very palatable to all grazing animals. Use it in mixtures to sow on lowlands for hay or pasture. Alsike Clover will tolerate flooding for longer periods, but it may be killed off if drought periods become prolonged.

    Establishment
    Alsike responds well to phosphate, potash and lime. Any needed fertilizer should be incorporated during seedbed preparation whenever possible. Soil pH should be brought up to at least 6.0 when a new stand is established. Soil should be firmed around the seed by using a drill with packer wheels or by cultipacking after seeding. Weedy competition needs to be controlled until the stand is established."
     
  8. Ghost

    Ghost Life Member

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    I would second the Alsike clover. I use it all the time in creek bottom plots.

    I would also recommend it because it is cheap seed at $50 to $60 for a 50 pound bag.

    If it floods out, you aren't really out much money. It is a very short lived clover and I like to "overseed/frost seed" each year.

    I would not recommend it for other clover plots though, as better, longer living clover seed can be purchased.
     

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