Cattle Pasture

Discussion in 'Whitetail Management' started by QDM, Jun 18, 2020.

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  1. QDM

    QDM Active Member

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    I’m looking for opinions on what you guys would do in this scenario. My grandma has an 80 (long, narrow rectangle) that is currently all row cropped up front and cattle pasture on the far right and backside.

    I need to minimize any disruptions to her cash flow so I’m considering fencing off the far south field (shaded in orange), from the creek and rest of the farm. This field would be roughly 6-7 acres and I’d like to turn it into deer/pheasant habitat/bedding.

    Since we’re going to try and keep it in the family down the road, but obviously no guarantees, I’d like to keep expenses to a minimum at this point.

    I’m planning to plant the majority into Eastern Red Cedar but will mix in other various trees. I’m open to any suggestions here as well?

    Would you guys just let the pasture grow up into whatever grows or would it be better to try and establish some actual native grasses/CRP? Access to this field will likely be limited for equipment due to the creek.

    Thanks for any input!

    IMG_2386.JPG IMG_2385.JPG


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  3. Hardwood11

    Hardwood11 Trump 2020

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    I would put in some swamp white oak and/or Swamp Bur Hybrids. You will have nice oak trees in 10-15 years, with acorns as early as 6 years. Cage or tube them.
     
  4. Hardwood11

    Hardwood11 Trump 2020

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    What the best access ?
     
  5. QDM

    QDM Active Member

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    I can access from the east and south through the neighbors which is most ideal for the prevailing west and northwest winds.


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  6. LoessHillsArcher

    LoessHillsArcher Well-Known Member

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    I agree - get some other stuff in there vs just the natural regrowth. Chinkapin oaks have done well for us as well as the above mentioned. Maybe some fruit trees or chestnuts as well. Native grasses are good but on an area like that I'd go with cedars and mixed hardwoods for cover all year including heavy snows.
     
  7. Sligh1

    Sligh1 Administrator Staff Member

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    All good stuff above
    What’s the soil like on that south end?
    Lots of varieties of trees if u can be patient. Which I guess anything u do is gonna take years of waiting but worth it. Off top of my head... I’d do cedars. Plus tons of varieties of shrubs. Plus ur fast growing “woods” which quality doesn’t matter.... maple, willow, box elder, sycamore, birch, walnut, etc Then- I’d do about 200-1000 trees u can tube..... fruit trees, nut producers (oaks, chestnut, whatever), persimmon & whatever else u want for specialty trees. Iowa dnr nursery + MO dnr nursery would have most of what u want. U got a solid 5 year commitment on ur hands. First year being biggest of course. Good luck!
     
  8. QDM

    QDM Active Member

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    Soils consist of udolpho loam, colo-ely complex and chelsea-lamont-fayette complex.




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  9. Sligh1

    Sligh1 Administrator Staff Member

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    Million ways to do this and million planting options... here’s a thought.... I’ve taken 2 to 10 acre areas and made 8’ fence surrounding it. Hedge posts or old poles or black locust. & junk fence from around farm. Could be one avenue to get a premium quality tree planting done. Not the only way to do it clearly. Some trees need zero protection, others need a lot. Tubes are also Options for trees needing some protection. Like I said- million ways do this, could do 40% trees, 40% natives & forbs & 20% food for one of gazillion examples.
     
  10. QDM

    QDM Active Member

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    I really appreciate the input so far, thanks everyone.

    I’m also curious on the survival without supplemental watering. While it will be possible to water the trees to an extent (and I realize a lot of varieties may require it).

    Can you guys advise on specific bare root seedlings and plug varieties that you’ve had success on without watering. I’m also talking tree survival under normal spring / fall rains since even the hardiest varieties likely can’t withstand extreme drought when trying to get established.

    Thanks!


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  11. Hardwood11

    Hardwood11 Trump 2020

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    I’ve never watered trees. With the exception of some Apple trees. Survival in 20 yrs+... guess 60-70%

    This year, it was dry early in MN—not the best survival. Cedar, plum, spruce, bur oak, hackberry are just a few trees that seem to survive the dry stretches.
     
  12. Sligh1

    Sligh1 Administrator Staff Member

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    Water isn’t the main issue on trees. It’s an issue if it gets to be a drought. Then needs water. Mortality is usually from critters, poor weed control, etc.
    I agree on above survival of 60-70%.
     
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