Clover in food plot

Discussion in 'Whitetail Management' started by Keef, May 7, 2018.

  1. Keef

    Keef Member

    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Location:
    Missouri
    My farm is in NE MO. I won't be able to get back to it until late May. I want to plant 2 acres of clover but am concerned it's too late. If we get adequate rain I'd be less concerned. What do you think? Thanks.
     
  2. AdBot Guest Advertisement

  3. Jbohn

    Jbohn PMA Member

    Messages:
    718
    Likes Received:
    180
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Pike , County Illinois
    Why don't you just wait until September and do the Cereal Mix with Clover what is there now is it Dirt ?
     
    goatman likes this.
  4. goatman

    goatman I hunt days ending in Y

    Messages:
    1,990
    Likes Received:
    344
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    east of big river
    I never had any luck with spring clover plots. I have 1/2" cracks now. Frost seeded clover in February. Still not growing yet. Probably won't. Will be doing it over in the fall.
     
  5. IowaBowHunter1983

    IowaBowHunter1983 Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    1,645
    Likes Received:
    594
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    SC Iowa
    Why do you think that is? I have great luck with spring clover. Always turns out better than ny frost seeded stuff.
     
  6. Sligh1

    Sligh1 Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    5,679
    Likes Received:
    1,182
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Central, IA
    Depends on: 1) soil (more organic matter or moisture & there's massive variations there) 2) Hiigher seeding rate helps in addition to adding an annual clover or possibly some oats.... Personally, I go heavy on a variety of clovers & do include an annual for variety of reasons - one being - annuals grow quicker & choke out weeds & deer love em. If I drill - not as critical. Go tear up a weedy seed bed mess.... Better go really heavy & use annual and maybe oats. 3) WEATHER. That's what gives ANY situation flexibility.... "hey, I planted beans July 4 & they did 50 bushels" VS "I planted beans May 15, didn't rain for 2 months & I got NOTHING!!! Same with clover.... Good weather, plenty of rain without scorching temps & you control weeds - no issue. A June & July like last year??? OUCH! Give it a whirl if you can handle the risks. Could be great, could bomb. 2 Variables above you can control, 1 you cannot.
     
  7. Keef

    Keef Member

    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Location:
    Missouri
    I've decided to plant beans and wait until fall and then put in some clover. Thanks for the feedback.
     
    Sligh1 likes this.
  8. Sligh1

    Sligh1 Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    5,679
    Likes Received:
    1,182
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Central, IA
    That’s a great option or plan. I make the same choice many times too. Lot of reasons: EASY. U don’t care if deer pound em. Fix N. Feed deer & major nutrition. Perfect seed bed, done right, come late summer plots. Good luck!
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice