Conjoined Oak Trees

Discussion in 'Iowa Whitetail Conference' started by Elvis188, Dec 10, 2019.

  1. Elvis188

    Elvis188 PMA Member

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    My dad found these Oak trees when he was a kid. He had told me about them and finally got around showing them to me shortly before he passed in 2011. He said he had never seen a pair like them and neither have I.

    as you can see one tree has grown into the other. I went to take pics yesterday and see that the cattle on the property have ringed the back on both trees and finally killed them. Kind of a shame. I don’t know if any of you have ever seen this but I thought I would share a few pics with everyone!
    BBBD263D-0802-4AEA-A79A-4F9BD171280A.jpeg F204D6B1-834B-405A-9F54-15B743B27033.jpeg
     
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  3. cybball

    cybball PMA Member

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    That is really cool. Never seen anything like that. Thanks for sharing.
     
  4. iowavf

    iowavf Member

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    Very odd.
     
  5. Daver

    Daver PMA Member

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    X2. Too bad they are dead now, I wonder if someone purposely joined them way back?? It looks like you have a great, natural deer hanging pole. :)
     
  6. IowaBowHunter1983

    IowaBowHunter1983 Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Natural buck pole!
     
  7. 203ntyp

    203ntyp PMA Member

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    That is really neat. I seen a smaller scenario on two smaller oaks not far from me on a farm I hunted for 18 years but it was a much shorter distance on the limb that conjoined them.

    Since those trees are dead I think I would try to cut that section out and do something crafty with it since it will rot away otherwise and no one will ever get to admire the uniqueness of what nature can display.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2019
    EatSleepHunt likes this.
  8. 2-bucks

    2-bucks PMA Member

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    I would have built deer camp right there just so I could use it as the buck pole!
     
  9. Elvis188

    Elvis188 PMA Member

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    No, they weren’t purposely joined. These are along a creek about 500 yards from where I was raised. Dad would be 80 next year and he said he first saw them when driving cattle as a kid. Pretty cool deal. I hated to see they were dead when I went to take pictures!
     
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  10. JNRBRONC

    JNRBRONC Moderator

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    You need to go kick a field goal.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  11. Sligh1

    Sligh1 Administrator Staff Member

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    That's frigin cool!!!! Wow!!! How those two meshed so perfectly at branch ends is mind boggling. I've never seen that either, very cool!!!!
     
  12. Slick

    Slick Active Member

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    Very neat!!!

    From the internet....

    Inosculation is a natural phenomenon in which trunks, branches or roots of two trees grow together. It is biologically similar to grafting and such trees are referred to in forestry as gemels, from the Latin word meaning "a pair".[1]

    It is most common for branches of two trees of the same species to grow together, though inosculation may be noted across related species. The branches first grow separately in proximity to each other until they touch. At this point, the bark on the touching surfaces is gradually abraded away as the trees move in the wind. Once the cambium of two trees touches, they sometimes self-graft and grow together as they expand in diameter. Inosculation customarily results when tree limbs are braided or pleached. DPVc1lkXUAAMgDM.jpg
     
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