"FOOD" for thought??... CWD & Never eating venison again?!?!?

Discussion in 'Iowa Whitetail Conference' started by Sligh1, Jan 20, 2019.

  1. loneranger

    loneranger Well-Known Member

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    Couldn't agree more!!!
     
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  3. JNRBRONC

    JNRBRONC Moderator

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    My MIL passed away from vCJD, a very nasty way to go. Lucky for her, she went relatively quick. Pathology tests of her brain confirmed vCJD. Most relatives don’t request an autopsy and it gets listed as Alzheimer’s, so is most likely under reported. We have no idea how/where she contracted it. Her father was a big hunter and fed a large family with lots of game. She had traveled to the UK about the time of the BSE there. When the test results came back, we stopped eating venison.


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  4. flounder9

    flounder9 Member

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    ZOONOSIS OF SCRAPIE TSE PRION

    O.05: Transmission of prions to primates after extended silent incubation periods: Implications for BSE and scrapie risk assessment in human populations

    Emmanuel Comoy, Jacqueline Mikol, Valerie Durand, Sophie Luccantoni, Evelyne Correia, Nathalie Lescoutra, Capucine Dehen, and Jean-Philippe Deslys Atomic Energy Commission; Fontenay-aux-Roses, France

    Prion diseases (PD) are the unique neurodegenerative proteinopathies reputed to be transmissible under field conditions since decades. The transmission of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) to humans evidenced that an animal PD might be zoonotic under appropriate conditions. Contrarily, in the absence of obvious (epidemiological or experimental) elements supporting a transmission or genetic predispositions, PD, like the other proteinopathies, are reputed to occur spontaneously (atpical animal prion strains, sporadic CJD summing 80% of human prion cases).

    Non-human primate models provided the first evidences supporting the transmissibiity of human prion strains and the zoonotic potential of BSE. Among them, cynomolgus macaques brought major information for BSE risk assessment for human health (Chen, 2014), according to their phylogenetic proximity to humans and extended lifetime. We used this model to assess the zoonotic potential of other animal PD from bovine, ovine and cervid origins even after very long silent incubation periods.

    *** We recently observed the direct transmission of a natural classical scrapie isolate to macaque after a 10-year silent incubation period,

    ***with features similar to some reported for human cases of sporadic CJD, albeit requiring fourfold long incubation than BSE. Scrapie, as recently evoked in humanized mice (Cassard, 2014),

    ***is the third potentially zoonotic PD (with BSE and L-type BSE),

    ***thus questioning the origin of human sporadic cases.

    We will present an updated panorama of our different transmission studies and discuss the implications of such extended incubation periods on risk assessment of animal PD for human health.

    ===============
    ***thus questioning the origin of human sporadic cases***
    ===============
    ***our findings suggest that possible transmission risk of H-type BSE to sheep and human. Bioassay will be required to determine whether the PMCA products are infectious to these animals.
    ==============

    https://prion2015.files.wordpress.com/2015/05/prion2015abstracts.pdf

    ***Transmission data also revealed that several scrapie prions propagate in HuPrP-Tg mice with efficiency comparable to that of cattle BSE. While the efficiency of transmission at primary passage was low, subsequent passages resulted in a highly virulent prion disease in both Met129 and Val129 mice.

    ***Transmission of the different scrapie isolates in these mice leads to the emergence of prion strain phenotypes that showed similar characteristics to those displayed by MM1 or VV2 sCJD prion.

    ***These results demonstrate that scrapie prions have a zoonotic potential and raise new questions about the possible link between animal and human prions.

    http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/19336896.2016.1163048?journalCode=kprn20

    PRION 2016 TOKYO

    Saturday, April 23, 2016

    SCRAPIE WS-01: Prion diseases in animals and zoonotic potential 2016

    Prion. 10:S15-S21. 2016 ISSN: 1933-6896 printl 1933-690X online

    Taylor & Francis

    Prion 2016 Animal Prion Disease Workshop Abstracts

    WS-01: Prion diseases in animals and zoonotic potential

    Juan Maria Torres a, Olivier Andreoletti b, J uan-Carlos Espinosa a. Vincent Beringue c. Patricia Aguilar a,
    Natalia Fernandez-Borges a. and Alba Marin-Moreno a

    "Centro de Investigacion en Sanidad Animal ( CISA-INIA ). Valdeolmos, Madrid. Spain; b UMR INRA -ENVT 1225 Interactions Holes Agents Pathogenes. ENVT. Toulouse. France: "UR892. Virologie lmmunologie MolécuIaires, Jouy-en-Josas. France

    Dietary exposure to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) contaminated bovine tissues is considered as the origin of variant Creutzfeldt Jakob (vCJD) disease in human. To date, BSE agent is the only recognized zoonotic prion... Despite the variety of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE) agents that have been circulating for centuries in farmed ruminants there is no apparent epidemiological link between exposure to ruminant products and the occurrence of other form of TSE in human like sporadic Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease (sCJD). However, the zoonotic potential of the diversity of circulating TSE agents has never been systematically assessed. The major issue in experimental assessment of TSEs zoonotic potential lies in the modeling of the ‘species barrier‘, the biological phenomenon that limits TSE agents’ propagation from a species to another. In the last decade, mice genetically engineered to express normal forms of the human prion protein has proved essential in studying human prions pathogenesis and modeling the capacity of TSEs to cross the human species barrier.

    To assess the zoonotic potential of prions circulating in farmed ruminants, we study their transmission ability in transgenic mice expressing human PrPC (HuPrP-Tg). Two lines of mice expressing different forms of the human PrPC (129Met or 129Val) are used to determine the role of the Met129Val dimorphism in susceptibility/resistance to the different agents.
    These transmission experiments confirm the ability of BSE prions to propagate in 129M- HuPrP-Tg mice and demonstrate that Met129 homozygotes may be susceptible to BSE in sheep or goat to a greater degree than the BSE agent in cattle and that these agents can convey molecular properties and neuropathological indistinguishable from vCJD. However homozygous 129V mice are resistant to all tested BSE derived prions independently of the originating species suggesting a higher transmission barrier for 129V-PrP variant.

    Transmission data also revealed that several scrapie prions propagate in HuPrP-Tg mice with efficiency comparable to that of cattle BSE. While the efficiency of transmission at primary passage was low, subsequent passages resulted in a highly virulent prion disease in both Met129 and Val129 mice.

    Transmission of the different scrapie isolates in these mice leads to the emergence of prion strain phenotypes that showed similar characteristics to those displayed by MM1 or VV2 sCJD prion.

    These results demonstrate that scrapie prions have a zoonotic potential and raise new questions about the possible link between animal and human prions.

    http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/19336896.2016.1163048?journalCode=kprn20

    why do we not want to do TSE transmission studies on chimpanzees $

    5. A positive result from a chimpanzee challenged severly would likely create alarm in some circles even if the result could not be interpreted for man.

    ***> I have a view that all these agents could be transmitted provided a large enough dose by appropriate routes was given and the animals kept long enough.

    ***> Until the mechanisms of the species barrier are more clearly understood it might be best to retain that hypothesis.
    snip...
    R. BRADLEY

    https://web.archive.org/web/2017012...einquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1990/09/23001001.pdf

    Title: Transmission of scrapie prions to primate after an extended silent incubation period)

    *** In complement to the recent demonstration that humanized mice are susceptible to scrapie, we report here the first observation of direct transmission of a natural classical scrapie isolate to a macaque after a 10-year incubation period.

    Neuropathologic examination revealed all of the features of a prion disease: spongiform change, neuronal loss, and accumulation of PrPres throughout the CNS.

    *** This observation strengthens the questioning of the harmlessness of scrapie to humans, at a time when protective measures for human and animal health are being dismantled and reduced as c-BSE is considered controlled and being eradicated.

    *** Our results underscore the importance of precautionary and protective measures and the necessity for long-term experimental transmission studies to assess the zoonotic potential of other animal prion strains.

    http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publications.htm?SEQ_NO_115=313160

    ***> Moreover, sporadic disease has never been observed in breeding colonies or primate research laboratories, most notably among hundreds of animals over several decades of study at the National Institutes of Health25, and in nearly twenty older animals continuously housed in our own facility. <***

    Transmission of scrapie prions to primate after an extended silent incubation period

    https://www.nature.com/articles/srep11573


    kind regards, terry
     
  5. flounder9

    flounder9 Member

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    zoonosis potential, or, already happened CWD TSE Prion...as sporadic CJD in humans

    ***2018***

    Cervid to human prion transmission

    Kong, Qingzhong

    Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, United States

    Abstract

    Prion disease is transmissible and invariably fatal. Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is the prion disease affecting deer, elk and moose, and it is a widespread and expanding epidemic affecting 22 US States and 2 Canadian provinces so far. CWD poses the most serious zoonotic prion transmission risks in North America because of huge venison consumption (>6 million deer/elk hunted and consumed annually in the USA alone), significant prion infectivity in muscles and other tissues/fluids from CWD-affected cervids, and usually high levels of individual exposure to CWD resulting from consumption of the affected animal among often just family and friends. However, we still do not know whether CWD prions can infect humans in the brain or peripheral tissues or whether clinical/asymptomatic CWD zoonosis has already occurred, and we have no essays to reliably detect CWD infection in humans.

    We hypothesize that:

    (1) The classic CWD prion strain can infect humans at low levels in the brain and peripheral lymphoid tissues;

    (2) The cervid-to-human transmission barrier is dependent on the cervid prion strain and influenced by the host (human) prion protein (PrP) primary sequence;

    (3) Reliable essays can be established to detect CWD infection in humans; and

    (4) CWD transmission to humans has already occurred. We will test these hypotheses in 4 Aims using transgenic (Tg) mouse models and complementary in vitro approaches.

    Aim 1 will prove that the classical CWD strain may infect humans in brain or peripheral lymphoid tissues at low levels by conducting systemic bioassays in a set of humanized Tg mouse lines expressing common human PrP variants using a number of CWD isolates at varying doses and routes. Experimental human CWD samples will also be generated for Aim 3.

    Aim 2 will test the hypothesis that the cervid-to-human prion transmission barrier is dependent on prion strain and influenced by the host (human) PrP sequence by examining and comparing the transmission efficiency and phenotypes of several atypical/unusual CWD isolates/strains as well as a few prion strains from other species that have adapted to cervid PrP sequence, utilizing the same panel of humanized Tg mouse lines as in Aim 1.

    Aim 3 will establish reliable essays for detection and surveillance of CWD infection in humans by examining in details the clinical, pathological, biochemical and in vitro seeding properties of existing and future experimental human CWD samples generated from Aims 1-2 and compare them with those of common sporadic human Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) prions.

    Aim 4 will attempt to detect clinical CWD-affected human cases by examining a significant number of brain samples from prion-affected human subjects in the USA and Canada who have consumed venison from CWD-endemic areas utilizing the criteria and essays established in Aim 3. The findings from this proposal will greatly advance our understandings on the potential and characteristics of cervid prion transmission in humans, establish reliable essays for CWD zoonosis and potentially discover the first case(s) of CWD infection in humans.

    Public Health Relevance

    There are significant and increasing human exposure to cervid prions because chronic wasting disease (CWD, a widespread and highly infectious prion disease among deer and elk in North America) continues spreading and consumption of venison remains popular, but our understanding on cervid-to-human prion transmission is still very limited, raising public health concerns. This proposal aims to define the zoonotic risks of cervid prions and set up and apply essays to detect CWD zoonosis using mouse models and in vitro methods. The findings will greatly expand our knowledge on the potentials and characteristics of cervid prion transmission in humans, establish reliable essays for such infections and may discover the first case(s) of CWD infection in humans.

    Funding Agency
    Agency
    National Institute of Health (NIH)

    http://grantome.com/grant/NIH/R01-NS088604-04

    ZOONOTIC CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD TSE PRION UPDATE

    here is the latest;

    PRION 2018 CONFERENCE

    Oral transmission of CWD into Cynomolgus macaques: signs of atypical disease, prion conversion and infectivity in macaques and bio-assayed transgenic mice

    Hermann M. Schatzl, Samia Hannaoui, Yo-Ching Cheng, Sabine Gilch (Calgary Prion Research Unit, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada) Michael Beekes (RKI Berlin), Walter Schulz-Schaeffer (University of Homburg/Saar, Germany), Christiane Stahl-Hennig (German Primate Center) & Stefanie Czub (CFIA Lethbridge).

    To date, BSE is the only example of interspecies transmission of an animal prion disease into humans. The potential zoonotic transmission of CWD is an alarming issue and was addressed by many groups using a variety of in vitro and in vivo experimental systems. Evidence from these studies indicated a substantial, if not absolute, species barrier, aligning with the absence of epidemiological evidence suggesting transmission into humans. Studies in non-human primates were not conclusive so far, with oral transmission into new-world monkeys and no transmission into old-world monkeys. Our consortium has challenged 18 Cynomolgus macaques with characterized CWD material, focusing on oral transmission with muscle tissue. Some macaques have orally received a total of 5 kg of muscle material over a period of 2 years.
    After 5-7 years of incubation time some animals showed clinical symptoms indicative of prion disease, and prion neuropathology and PrPSc deposition were detected in spinal cord and brain of some euthanized animals. PrPSc in immunoblot was weakly detected in some spinal cord materials and various tissues tested positive in RT-QuIC, including lymph node and spleen homogenates. To prove prion infectivity in the macaque tissues, we have intracerebrally inoculated 2 lines of transgenic mice, expressing either elk or human PrP. At least 3 TgElk mice, receiving tissues from 2 different macaques, showed clinical signs of a progressive prion disease and brains were positive in immunoblot and RT-QuIC. Tissues (brain, spinal cord and spleen) from these and pre-clinical mice are currently tested using various read-outs and by second passage in mice. Transgenic mice expressing human PrP were so far negative for clear clinical prion disease (some mice >300 days p.i.). In parallel, the same macaque materials are inoculated into bank voles.

    Taken together, there is strong evidence of transmissibility of CWD orally into macaques and from macaque tissues into transgenic mouse models, although with an incomplete attack rate.

    The clinical and pathological presentation in macaques was mostly atypical, with a strong emphasis on spinal cord pathology.
    Our ongoing studies will show whether the transmission of CWD into macaques and passage in transgenic mice represents a form of non-adaptive prion amplification, and whether macaque-adapted prions have the potential to infect mice expressing human PrP.

    The notion that CWD can be transmitted orally into both new-world and old-world non-human primates asks for a careful reevaluation of the zoonotic risk of CWD..

    ***> The notion that CWD can be transmitted orally into both new-world and old-world non-human primates asks for a careful reevaluation of the zoonotic risk of CWD. <***

    https://prion2018.org/

    READING OVER THE PRION 2018 ABSTRACT BOOK, LOOKS LIKE THEY FOUND THAT from this study ;

    P190 Human prion disease mortality rates by occurrence of chronic wasting disease in freeranging cervids, United States

    SEEMS THAT THEY FOUND Highly endemic states had a higher rate of prion disease mortality compared to non-CWD states.

    AND ANOTHER STUDY;

    P172 Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients with Prion Disease

    IN THIS STUDY, THERE WERE autopsy-proven prion cases from the National Prion Disease Pathology Surveillance Center that were diagnosed between September 2016 to March 2017,

    AND

    included 104 patients. SEEMS THEY FOUND THAT The most common sCJD subtype was MV1-2 (30%), followed by MM1-2 (20%),

    AND

    THAT The Majority of cases were male (60%), AND half of them had exposure to wild game.

    snip...

    see more on Prion 2017 Macaque study from Prion 2017 Conference and other updated science on cwd tse prion zoonosis below...terry

    https://prion2018.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/program.pdf

    https://prion2018.org/

    THURSDAY, OCTOBER 04, 2018

    Cervid to human prion transmission 5R01NS088604-04 Update

    http://grantome.com/grant/NIH/R01-NS088604-04

    http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2018/10/cervid-to-human-prion-transmission.html

    Saturday, December 15, 2018

    ***> ADRD Summit RFI Singeltary COMMENT SUBMISSION BSE, SCRAPIE, CWD, AND HUMAN TSE PRION DISEASE December 14, 2018

    https://prionprp.blogspot.com/2018/12/adrd-summit-rfi-singeltary-comment.html

    http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2018/10/cervid-to-human-prion-transmission.html

    Saturday, December 15, 2018

    ***> ADRD Summit RFI Singeltary COMMENT SUBMISSION BSE, SCRAPIE, CWD, AND HUMAN TSE PRION DISEASE December 14, 2018

    https://prionprp.blogspot.com/2018/12/adrd-summit-rfi-singeltary-comment.html


    kind regards, terry
     
  6. flounder9

    flounder9 Member

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    i am very sorry for your loss to this damn disease...kind regards, terry
     
  7. flounder9

    flounder9 Member

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    CJD9/10022

    October 1994

    Mr R.N. Elmhirst Chairman British Deer Farmers Association Holly Lodge Spencers Lane BerksWell Coventry CV7 7BZ

    Dear Mr Elmhirst,

    CREUTZFELDT-JAKOB DISEASE (CJD) SURVEILLANCE UNIT REPORT

    Thank you for your recent letter concerning the publication of the third annual report from the CJD Surveillance Unit. I am sorry that you are dissatisfied with the way in which this report was published.

    snip...

    I believe that a further statement about the report, or indeed statistical links between CJD and consumption of venison, would increase, and quite possibly give damaging credence, to the whole issue. From the low key media reports of which I am aware it seems unlikely that venison consumption will suffer adversely, if at all.

    http://web.archive.org/web/20030511010117/http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1994/10/00003001.pdf

    5.195 Among occupational groups exposed to BSE, farmers remain unusual in having such an excess over the incidence of CJD for the population as a whole. No cases of CJD have been reported amount veterinarians exposed to BSE. Four people in the meat industry (butchers, abattoirs, rendering plants, etc) have been reported to have vCJD.386 The present evidence has been accepted by some as reassuring in that such occupations may not pose as serious a risk as might have been expected.

    https://web.archive.org/web/20090505200142/http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/pdf/volume8/Chapter5.pdf

    This was not simply another farmer but the third farmer......

    https://web.archive.org/web/2009050...einquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1995/06/21002001.pdf

    suspect case of CJD in a farmer who has had a case of BSE in his beef suckler herd.

    http://web.archive.org/web/20030331213802/http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1995/10/23006001.pdf

    cover-up of 4th farm worker ???

    http://web.archive.org/web/20030516083454/http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1995/10/23006001.pdf

    http://web.archive.org/web/20030330175323/http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1995/10/20006001.pdf

    CONFIRMATION OF CJD IN FOURTH FARMER

    https://web.archive.org/web/2009050...einquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1995/11/03008001.pdf

    now story changes from;

    SEAC concluded that, if the fourth case were confirmed, it would be worrying, especially as all four farmers with CJD would have had BSE cases on their farms.

    to;

    This is not unexpected...

    was another farmer expected?

    http://web.archive.org/web/20030728074919/http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1995/11/13010001.pdf

    4th farmer, and 1st teenager

    https://web.archive.org/web/2009050...einquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1996/02/27003001.pdf

    2. snip...

    Over a 5 year period, which is the time period on which the advice from Professor Smith and Dr. Gore was based, and assuming a population of 120,000 dairy farm workers, and an annual incidence of 1 per million cases of CJD in the general population, a DAIRY FARM WORKER IS 5 TIMES MORE LIKELY THAN an individual in the general population to develop CJD. Using the actual current annual incidence of CJD in the UK of 0.7 per million, this figure becomes 7.5 TIMES.

    3. You will recall that the advice provided by Professor Smith in 1993 and by Dr. Gore this month used the sub-population of dairy farm workers who had had a case of BSE on their farms - 63,000, which is approximately half the number of dairy farm workers - as a denominator. If the above sums are repeated using this denominator population, taking an annual incidence in the general population of 1 per million the observed rate in this sub-population is 10 TIMES, and taking an annual incidence of 0.7 per million, IT IS 15 TIMES (THE ''WORST CASE'' SCENARIO) than that in the general population...

    http://web.archive.org/web/20030516181226/http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1995/01/31004001.pdf

    CJD FARMERS WIFE 1989

    https://web.archive.org/web/2009050...einquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1989/10/13007001.pdf

    https://web.archive.org/web/2009050...einquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1989/10/13003001.pdf

    20 year old died from sCJD in USA in 1980 and a 16 year old in 1981. A 19 year old died from sCJD in France in 1985. There is no evidence of an iatrogenic cause for those cases....

    http://web.archive.org/web/20030330212925/http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1995/10/04004001.pdf

    THE COVER UP OF MAD COW DISEASE IN FARMERS, FARMERS WIVES, AND VICKY RIMMER, THE DAY MAD COW SCIENCE CHANGED $$$

    Monday, May 19, 2008

    *** SPORADIC CJD IN FARMERS, FARMERS WIVES, FROM FARMS WITH BSE HERD AND ABATTOIRS ***

    http://bseinquiry.blogspot.com/2008/05/sporadic-cjd-in-farmers-farmers-wives.html

    o.k. folks, i will have to put my ten foil hat on, and get all tuned in, so prepare yourself, i will get into Alzheimer's disease a TSE prion, and now in cattle. FEED, FEED, FEED, NEXT...

    kind regards, terry
     
  8. flounder9

    flounder9 Member

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    all tuned in, here goes...

    Singeltary comments;

    Re-Evidence for human transmission of amyloid-β pathology and cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    >>> The only tenable public line will be that "more research is required’’ <<<

    >>> possibility on a transmissible prion remains open<<<

    O.K., so it’s about 23 years later, so somebody please tell me, when is "more research is required’’ enough time for evaluation ?

    Re-Evidence for human transmission of amyloid-β pathology and cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    Nature 525, 247?250 (10 September 2015) doi:10.1038/nature15369 Received 26 April 2015 Accepted 14 August 2015 Published online 09 September 2015 Updated online 11 September 2015 Erratum (October, 2015)

    snip...see full Singeltary Nature comment here;

    Alzheimer's disease

    let's not forget the elephant in the room. curing Alzheimer's would be a great and wonderful thing, but for starters, why not start with the obvious, lets prove the cause or causes, and then start to stop that. think iatrogenic, friendly fire, or the pass it forward mode of transmission. think medical, surgical, dental, tissue, blood, related transmission. think transmissible spongiform encephalopathy aka tse prion disease aka mad cow type disease...

    Commentary: Evidence for human transmission of amyloid-β pathology and cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    http://journals.plos.org/plosone/ar...notation/933cc83a-a384-45c3-b3b2-336882c30f9d

    http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article/comments?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0111492

    http://journals.plos.org/plosone/ar...notation/933cc83a-a384-45c3-b3b2-336882c30f9d

    https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnagi.2016.00005/full

    Self-Propagative Replication of Ab Oligomers Suggests Potential Transmissibility in Alzheimer Disease

    *** Singeltary comment PLoS ***

    Alzheimer’s disease and Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy prion disease, Iatrogenic, what if ?
    Posted by flounder on 05 Nov 2014 at 21:27 GMT


    Alzheimer’s disease and Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy prion disease, Iatrogenic, what if ?

    Background

    Alzheimer’s disease and Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy disease have both been around a long time, and was discovered in or around the same time frame, early 1900’s. Both diseases are incurable and debilitating brain disease, that are in the end, 100% fatal, with the incubation/clinical period of the Alzheimer’s disease being longer (most of the time) than the TSE prion disease. Symptoms are very similar, and pathology is very similar.

    Methods

    Through years of research, as a layperson, of peer review journals, transmission studies, and observations of loved ones and friends that have died from both Alzheimer’s and the TSE prion disease i.e. Heidenhain Variant Creutzfelt Jakob Disease CJD.

    Results

    I propose that Alzheimer’s is a TSE disease of low dose, slow, and long incubation disease, and that Alzheimer’s is Transmissible, and is a threat to the public via the many Iatrogenic routes and sources. It was said long ago that the only thing that disputes this, is Alzheimer’s disease transmissibility, or the lack of. The likelihood of many victims of Alzheimer’s disease from the many different Iatrogenic routes and modes of transmission as with the TSE prion disease.

    Conclusions

    There should be a Global Congressional Science round table event set up immediately to address these concerns from the many potential routes and sources of the TSE prion disease, including Alzheimer’s disease, and a emergency global doctrine put into effect to help combat the spread of Alzheimer’s disease via the medical, surgical, dental, tissue, and blood arena’s. All human and animal TSE prion disease, including Alzheimer’s should be made reportable in every state, and Internationally, WITH NO age restrictions. Until a proven method of decontamination and autoclaving is proven, and put forth in use universally, in all hospitals and medical, surgical arena’s, or the TSE prion agent will continue to spread. IF we wait until science and corporate politicians wait until politics lets science _prove_ this once and for all, and set forth regulations there from, we will all be exposed to the TSE Prion agents, if that has not happened already.

    end...tss

    http://www.plosone.org/annotation/listThread.action?root=82860

    IN CONFIDENCE

    5 NOVEMBER 1992

    TRANSMISSION OF ALZHEIMER TYPE PLAQUES TO PRIMATES

    [9. Whilst this matter is not at the moment directly concerned with the iatrogenic CJD cases from hgH, there remains a possibility of litigation here, and this presents an added complication.

    There are also results to be made available shortly

    (1) concerning a farmer with CJD who had BSE animals,

    (2) on the possible transmissibility of Alzheimer’s and

    (3) a CMO letter on prevention of iatrogenic CJD transmission in neurosurgery, all of which will serve to increase media interest.]

    https://web.archive.org/web/2017012...einquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1992/11/04001001.pdf

    https://web.archive.org/web/2004031...einquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1992/12/16005001.pdf

    https://web.archive.org/web/20040315075058/www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1992/12/16005001.pdf

    P132 Aged cattle brain displays Alzheimer’s-like pathology that can be propagated in a prionlike manner

    Ines Moreno-Gonzalez (1), George Edwards III (1), Rodrigo Morales (1), Claudia Duran-Aniotz (1), Mercedes Marquez (2), Marti Pumarola (2), Claudio Soto (1)

    snip...

    These results may contribute to uncover a previously unsuspected etiology surrounding some cases of sporadic AD. However, the early and controversial stage of the field of prion-like transmission in non-prion diseases added to the artificial nature of the animal models utilized for these studies, indicate that extrapolation of the results to humans should not be done without further experiments.

    P75 Determining transmissibility and proteome changes associated with abnormal bovine prionopathy

    Dudas S (1,2), Seuberlich T (3), Czub S (1,2)

    In prion diseases, it is believed that altered protein conformation encodes for different pathogenic strains. Currently 3 different strains of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) are confirmed. Diagnostic tests for BSE are able to identify animals infected with all 3 strains, however, several diagnostic laboratories have reported samples with inconclusive results which are challenging to classify. It was suggested that these may be novel strains of BSE; to determine transmissibility, brain material from index cases were inoculated into cattle.

    In the first passage, cattle were intra-cranially challenged with brain homogenate from 2 Swiss animals with abnormal prionopathy. The challenged cattle incubated for 3 years and were euthanized with no clinical signs of neurologic disease. Animals were negative when tested on validated diagnostic tests but several research methods demonstrated changes in the prion conformation in these cattle, including density gradient centrifugation and immunohistochemistry. Currently, samples from the P1 animals are being tested for changes in protein levels using 2-D Fluorescence Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2D DIGE) and mass spectrometry. It is anticipated that, if a prionopathy is present, this approach should identify pathways and targets to decipher the source of altered protein conformation. In addition, a second set of cattle have been challenged with brain material from the first passage. Ideally, these cattle will be given a sufficient incubation period to provide a definitive answer to the question of transmissibility.

    =====prion 2018===

    https://prion2018.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/program.pdf

    https://prion2018.org/

    ***however in 1 C-type challenged animal, Prion 2015 Poster Abstracts

    S67 PrPsc was not detected using rapid tests for BSE.

    ***Subsequent testing resulted in the detection of pathologic lesion in unusual brain location and PrPsc detection by PMCA only.

    *** IBNC Tauopathy or TSE Prion disease, it appears, no one is sure ***

    Posted by Terry S. Singeltary Sr. on 03 Jul 2015 at 16:53 GMT

    http://www.plosone.org/annotation/listThread.action?root=86610

    continued...
     
  9. flounder9

    flounder9 Member

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    part 2 final;

    P.9.21

    Molecular characterization of BSE in Canada

    *** This supports the theory that the importation of BSE contaminated feedstuff is the source of C-type BSE in Canada.

    *** It also suggests a similar cause or source for atypical BSE in these countries. ***

    see page 176 of 201 pages...tss

    http://www.neuroprion.org/resources/pdf_docs/conferences/prion2009/prion2009_bookofabstracts.pdf

    https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0010638

    *** Singeltary reply ; Molecular, Biochemical and Genetic Characteristics of BSE in Canada Singeltary reply;

    http://www.plosone.org/annotation/l...id=635CE9094E0EA15D5362B7D7B809448C?root=7143

    https://journals.plos.org/plosone/a...notation/4f9be886-69fe-4c7c-922b-85b0ecbe6d53

    http://bovineprp.blogspot.com/2018/02/

    On behalf of the Scientific Committee, I am pleased to inform you that your abstract

    'Transmissible Spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) animal and human TSE in North America update October 2009'

    WAS accepted for inclusion in the INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC EXCHANGE (ISE) section of the 14th International Congress on Infectious Diseases. Accordingly, your abstract will be included in the "Intl. Scientific Exchange abstract CD-rom" of the Congress which will be distributed to all participants.

    Abstracts accepted for INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC EXCHANGE are NOT PRESENTED in the oral OR poster sessions.

    Your abstract below was accepted for: INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC EXCHANGE

    #0670: Transmissible Spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) animal and human TSE in North America update October 2009

    Author: T. Singeltary; Bacliff, TX/US

    Topic: Emerging Infectious Diseases Preferred type of presentation: International Scientific Exchange

    This abstract has been ACCEPTED.

    #0670: Transmissible Spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) animal and human TSE in North America update October 2009

    Authors: T. Singeltary; Bacliff, TX/US

    Title: Transmissible Spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) animal and human TSE in North America update October 2009

    Body: Background

    An update on atypical BSE and other TSE in North America. Please remember, the typical U.K. c-BSE, the atypical l-BSE (BASE), and h-BSE have all been documented in North America, along with the typical scrapie's, and atypical Nor-98 Scrapie, and to date, 2 different strains of CWD, and also TME. All these TSE in different species have been rendered and fed to food producing animals for humans and animals in North America (TSE in cats and dogs ?), and that the trading of these TSEs via animals and products via the USA and Canada has been immense over the years, decades.

    Methods

    12 years independent research of available data

    Results

    I propose that the current diagnostic criteria for human TSEs only enhances and helps the spreading of human TSE from the continued belief of the UKBSEnvCJD only theory in 2009. With all the science to date refuting it, to continue to validate this old myth, will only spread this TSE agent through a multitude of potential routes and sources i.e. consumption, medical i.e., surgical, blood, dental, endoscopy, optical, nutritional supplements, cosmetics etc.

    Conclusion

    I would like to submit a review of past CJD surveillance in the USA, and the urgent need to make all human TSE in the USA a reportable disease, in every state, of every age group, and to make this mandatory immediately without further delay. The ramifications of not doing so will only allow this agent to spread further in the medical, dental, surgical arena's. Restricting the reporting of CJD and or any human TSE is NOT scientific. Iatrogenic CJD knows NO age group, TSE knows no boundaries.

    I propose as with Aguzzi, Asante, Collinge, Caughey, Deslys, Dormont, Gibbs, Gajdusek, Ironside, Manuelidis, Marsh, et al and many more, that the world of TSE Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy is far from an exact science, but there is enough proven science to date that this myth should be put to rest once and for all, and that we move forward with a new classification for human and animal TSE that would properly identify the infected species, the source species, and then the route.

    Keywords: Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease Prion

    page 114 ;

    http://ww2.isid.org/Downloads/14th_ICID_ISE_Abstracts.pdf

    http://www.isid.org/14th_icid/

    http://www.isid.org/publications/ICID_Archive.shtml

    http://ww2.isid.org/Downloads/IMED2009_AbstrAuth.pdf

    Tuesday, December 12, 2017

    Neuropathology of iatrogenic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease and immunoassay of French cadaver-sourced growth hormone batches suggest possible transmission of tauopathy and long incubation periods for the transmission of Abeta pathology

    http://tauopathies.blogspot.com/2017/12/neuropathology-of-iatrogenic.html

    TUESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2019

    CHILDHOOD EXPOSURE TO CADAVERIC DURA

    https://betaamyloidcjd.blogspot.com/2019/01/childhood-exposure-to-cadaveric-dura.html

    with sad regards, wasted days and wasted nights, terry singeltary sr.
     
  10. Muskrat24

    Muskrat24 Active Member

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    QUOTE="flounder9, post: 650130, member: 19409"]ZOONOSIS OF SCRAPIE TSE PRION

    O.05: Transmission of prions to primates after extended silent incubation periods: Implications for BSE and scrapie risk assessment in human populations

    Emmanuel Comoy, Jacqueline Mikol, Valerie Durand, Sophie Luccantoni, Evelyne Correia, Nathalie Lescoutra, Capucine Dehen, and Jean-Philippe Deslys Atomic Energy Commission; Fontenay-aux-Roses, France

    Prion diseases (PD) are the unique neurodegenerative proteinopathies reputed to be transmissible under field conditions since decades. The transmission of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) to humans evidenced that an animal PD might be zoonotic under appropriate conditions. Contrarily, in the absence of obvious (epidemiological or experimental) elements supporting a transmission or genetic predispositions, PD, like the other proteinopathies, are reputed to occur spontaneously (atpical animal prion strains, sporadic CJD summing 80% of human prion cases).

    Non-human primate models provided the first evidences supporting the transmissibiity of human prion strains and the zoonotic potential of BSE. Among them, cynomolgus macaques brought major information for BSE risk assessment for human health (Chen, 2014), according to their phylogenetic proximity to humans and extended lifetime. We used this model to assess the zoonotic potential of other animal PD from bovine, ovine and cervid origins even after very long silent incubation periods.

    *** We recently observed the direct transmission of a natural classical scrapie isolate to macaque after a 10-year silent incubation period,

    ***with features similar to some reported for human cases of sporadic CJD, albeit requiring fourfold long incubation than BSE. Scrapie, as recently evoked in humanized mice (Cassard, 2014),

    ***is the third potentially zoonotic PD (with BSE and L-type BSE),

    ***thus questioning the origin of human sporadic cases.

    We will present an updated panorama of our different transmission studies and discuss the implications of such extended incubation periods on risk assessment of animal PD for human health.

    ===============
    ***thus questioning the origin of human sporadic cases***
    ===============
    ***our findings suggest that possible transmission risk of H-type BSE to sheep and human. Bioassay will be required to determine whether the PMCA products are infectious to these animals.
    ==============

    https://prion2015.files.wordpress.com/2015/05/prion2015abstracts.pdf

    ***Transmission data also revealed that several scrapie prions propagate in HuPrP-Tg mice with efficiency comparable to that of cattle BSE. While the efficiency of transmission at primary passage was low, subsequent passages resulted in a highly virulent prion disease in both Met129 and Val129 mice.

    ***Transmission of the different scrapie isolates in these mice leads to the emergence of prion strain phenotypes that showed similar characteristics to those displayed by MM1 or VV2 sCJD prion.

    ***These results demonstrate that scrapie prions have a zoonotic potential and raise new questions about the possible link between animal and human prions.

    http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/19336896.2016.1163048?journalCode=kprn20

    PRION 2016 TOKYO

    Saturday, April 23, 2016

    SCRAPIE WS-01: Prion diseases in animals and zoonotic potential 2016

    Prion. 10:S15-S21. 2016 ISSN: 1933-6896 printl 1933-690X online

    Taylor & Francis

    Prion 2016 Animal Prion Disease Workshop Abstracts

    WS-01: Prion diseases in animals and zoonotic potential

    Juan Maria Torres a, Olivier Andreoletti b, J uan-Carlos Espinosa a. Vincent Beringue c. Patricia Aguilar a,
    Natalia Fernandez-Borges a. and Alba Marin-Moreno a

    "Centro de Investigacion en Sanidad Animal ( CISA-INIA ). Valdeolmos, Madrid. Spain; b UMR INRA -ENVT 1225 Interactions Holes Agents Pathogenes. ENVT. Toulouse. France: "UR892. Virologie lmmunologie MolécuIaires, Jouy-en-Josas. France

    Dietary exposure to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) contaminated bovine tissues is considered as the origin of variant Creutzfeldt Jakob (vCJD) disease in human. To date, BSE agent is the only recognized zoonotic prion... Despite the variety of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE) agents that have been circulating for centuries in farmed ruminants there is no apparent epidemiological link between exposure to ruminant products and the occurrence of other form of TSE in human like sporadic Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease (sCJD). However, the zoonotic potential of the diversity of circulating TSE agents has never been systematically assessed. The major issue in experimental assessment of TSEs zoonotic potential lies in the modeling of the ‘species barrier‘, the biological phenomenon that limits TSE agents’ propagation from a species to another. In the last decade, mice genetically engineered to express normal forms of the human prion protein has proved essential in studying human prions pathogenesis and modeling the capacity of TSEs to cross the human species barrier.

    To assess the zoonotic potential of prions circulating in farmed ruminants, we study their transmission ability in transgenic mice expressing human PrPC (HuPrP-Tg). Two lines of mice expressing different forms of the human PrPC (129Met or 129Val) are used to determine the role of the Met129Val dimorphism in susceptibility/resistance to the different agents.
    These transmission experiments confirm the ability of BSE prions to propagate in 129M- HuPrP-Tg mice and demonstrate that Met129 homozygotes may be susceptible to BSE in sheep or goat to a greater degree than the BSE agent in cattle and that these agents can convey molecular properties and neuropathological indistinguishable from vCJD. However homozygous 129V mice are resistant to all tested BSE derived prions independently of the originating species suggesting a higher transmission barrier for 129V-PrP variant.

    Transmission data also revealed that several scrapie prions propagate in HuPrP-Tg mice with efficiency comparable to that of cattle BSE. While the efficiency of transmission at primary passage was low, subsequent passages resulted in a highly virulent prion disease in both Met129 and Val129 mice.

    Transmission of the different scrapie isolates in these mice leads to the emergence of prion strain phenotypes that showed similar characteristics to those displayed by MM1 or VV2 sCJD prion.

    These results demonstrate that scrapie prions have a zoonotic potential and raise new questions about the possible link between animal and human prions.

    http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/19336896.2016.1163048?journalCode=kprn20

    why do we not want to do TSE transmission studies on chimpanzees $

    5. A positive result from a chimpanzee challenged severly would likely create alarm in some circles even if the result could not be interpreted for man.

    ***> I have a view that all these agents could be transmitted provided a large enough dose by appropriate routes was given and the animals kept long enough.

    ***> Until the mechanisms of the species barrier are more clearly understood it might be best to retain that hypothesis.
    snip...
    R. BRADLEY

    https://web.archive.org/web/2017012...einquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1990/09/23001001.pdf

    Title: Transmission of scrapie prions to primate after an extended silent incubation period)

    *** In complement to the recent demonstration that humanized mice are susceptible to scrapie, we report here the first observation of direct transmission of a natural classical scrapie isolate to a macaque after a 10-year incubation period.

    Neuropathologic examination revealed all of the features of a prion disease: spongiform change, neuronal loss, and accumulation of PrPres throughout the CNS.

    *** This observation strengthens the questioning of the harmlessness of scrapie to humans, at a time when protective measures for human and animal health are being dismantled and reduced as c-BSE is considered controlled and being eradicated.

    *** Our results underscore the importance of precautionary and protective measures and the necessity for long-term experimental transmission studies to assess the zoonotic potential of other animal prion strains.

    http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publications.htm?SEQ_NO_115=313160

    ***> Moreover, sporadic disease has never been observed in breeding colonies or primate research laboratories, most notably among hundreds of animals over several decades of study at the National Institutes of Health25, and in nearly twenty older animals continuously housed in our own facility. <***

    Transmission of scrapie prions to primate after an extended silent incubation period

    https://www.nature.com/articles/srep11573


    kind regards, terry[/QUOTE]
    Thanks for the info!
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2019
  11. Fishbonker

    Fishbonker Life Member

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    CWD is another example in life where the right thing to do is the least palatable.
     
  12. loneranger

    loneranger Well-Known Member

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    Sum all of that up will Ya?
     
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  13. MN Hunter

    MN Hunter Active Member

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    Terry,
    Obviously you have a considerable amount of time invested in this. Without reading every link and study you have posted, a quarter of it I am unable to follow anyways. Is there any current studies etc on taxidermists and any illness’ they may acquire. More instances of CJD or Alzheimer’s? Seems to reason that they would be more susceptible to this than the average hunter?
    Along those same lines, has there been any studies in Colorado with CJD and Alzheimer’s? Are the rates at a higher percentage in Colorado than anywhere else?

    We are currently dealing with cwd on our property. We have shot 3 infected and the neighboring farms have also shot some during the past 3 years. After numerous extended hunting seasons the DNR contracted federal sharpshooters for the next 2 months to kill as many as possible. Hunting over corn, at night and out of their trucks. There doesn’t seem to be a long term management plan for this. Will the extended hunting seasons and sharpshooting happen every year until the funding runs out? Or what’s the next plan? That’s the billion dollar question.

    If you don’t have cwd detected near you, consider yourself lucky. Do everything in your power to keep it away. Don’t concentrate deer using minerals licks, feeding etc. I didn’t think I’d ever deal with cwd either but it happened. And all the years I spent feeding deer and freshening up mineral licks probably contritubuted to the spread of cwd once it found its way onto our property.
     
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  14. Kaleb

    Kaleb Active Member

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    Fillmore Co?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  15. MN Hunter

    MN Hunter Active Member

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    Yes
     
  16. Kaleb

    Kaleb Active Member

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    Sorry to hear. I’ve attended 3 DNR meetings, 2 of which in Preston and I’ve not been impressed at any of them.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  17. MN Hunter

    MN Hunter Active Member

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    I’ve attended both of the Preston meetings. I agree with you on that. The second meeting had about half the crowd as the first with mostly older folks. The dnr seems to have no clear long term plan. More or less throwing darts at a wall and seeing which ones stick.
     
  18. dtr

    dtr Member

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    I spent thanksgiving with a pathologist and we talked a lot about CWD. She basically said that there was no way for deer to develop an immunity to CWD because of the prions. She also said that she would never eat deer meat because she felt it was possible for the prions to be passed on to humans. My freezer is full of venison and i eat 3-4 pounds a week but it was interesting to hear how adamant she was. And she is so knowledgeable about prions. I couldn't comprehend 90% of what she said.
     
  19. bluedog69

    bluedog69 Member

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    So we should worry more about eating deer than beef? Mad cow has infected humans. CWD not yet.

    How do we not know that millions of cattle aren’t processed for human consumption everyday that may have mad cow disease?

    Why are some hell bent on making CWD scary enough to get people to quit deer hunting or eating deer?

    Want to totally wreck agriculture? Eliminate beef as a possible food source due to mad cow and possible human outbreaks. That would render Iowa corn and beans worthless.

    I can’t seem to get the smell of rat to go away.
     
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  20. Kaleb

    Kaleb Active Member

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    I would surely imagine there is some sort of testing in place with beef??

    I understand your sentiment, but don’t you think the dialogue of the possibility should continue for safety sake?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
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  21. Ishi

    Ishi PMA Member

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    I haven’t been contacted yet to be studied :D I’ve been around many thousands of deer brains.... does make me wonder though but the man upstairs has a plan for each one of us
     
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