Idaho Elk Hunt clothing

Discussion in 'Hunting Out of State' started by tyler883, Jul 5, 2018.

  1. tyler883

    tyler883 Member

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    I'm going to Idaho Sept 15th-21st to do an elk hunt with a guide. I have everything ready to go except the clothing part. I'm completely torn on what to get or need. I have a pile of under armour base layers and planty of good liner socks and wool socks. I have been looking at the sitka line for outer layers, but not sure on what I should get or need. I have looked at the first lite, but the problem with that stuff is you can't see or touch it before you buy it. The weather is going to be all over the place im sure. Also should mention this is a pack in horseback deal as well. Any advice will be much appreciated!
     
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  3. Daver

    Daver PMA Member

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    Not Idaho and it wasn't in Sept...but I went on an elk trip last fall and learned some things regarding clothing that I will share. Apply them as you see fit.

    We were in Montana in November and the overnight lows were in the -15 to -20 range, with daytime, ahem, "highs" in the 0 to 10 above range...and I was overdressed for the first couple of days of hunting and sweating like a pig. We were staying in wall tents that did have a wood stove in them, but when that baby ran out of wood in the middle of the night it got FROSTY quick like! :) We also were "horsing" it, which I really enjoyed...except for the time that my steed tried to throw me over a cliff that is! :) Also, consider your boots...and this is also from the "I am lucky to still be alive" manual...big toed, well insulated boots are a pooper when you try to get them in the stirrups! A key bit of horse wisdom...you DO NOT want your boot(s) stuck in a stirrup if you fall off and the horse keeps boogeying on...which they will!

    If you are going to "run and gun" and not sit still all day, you can dress much lighter than you think. A base layer of polypropylene undies, medium weight wool pants and a good wool shirt and then maybe a wool vest...good hat, gloves and boots and you are set. The smart guys wore fanny packs only and traveled light...I, and some of you jokers, like Wapsi, can draw your own inferences here :), started off the week with my regular, decent sized backpack and then got smarter as time went on and only was wearing my fanny pack by the end of the week.

    All the guides wore wool, a couple of the hunters in camp were all decked out in Sitka gear, etc. But I think it was telling that the "pros" were in plain ol' wool. I had wool too, but it was too heavy for the amount of walking that we did. Good hats(wool too), gloves and boots and you are good to go. Enjoy!
     
  4. Jmac0501

    Jmac0501 Member

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    Never been elk hunting, but, if you want to touch/see some first lite stuff, I live North East of Ankeny. I love it for hunting here in Iowa, all the way from youth season, to late season MZ.
     
  5. flugge

    flugge PMA Member

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    I was in Southern Colorado last year elk hunting, I used all moisture wicking type clothes. I only wore a jacket one day, and never wore my base layers when I was hunting. Oddly, I only used my base layers to sleep. I did have sweatshirt I wore in the mornings, but generally I was sweating so bad it wasnt an option. I was a fat kid trying to climb mountains and it didnt work well. If you know the terrain will be tough and you will be moving a lot, I would suggest some lighter type clothes.
     
  6. TeenageHunter

    TeenageHunter McNorrisBieber Staff Member

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    I have frogg toggs rain wear from Walmart, WORKS AMAZING. Get the pants/jacket combo. I've used them for Elk, Deer, and Bear in Wyoming/Colorado/Idaho.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    I've heard nothing but great things from Cabela's Space Rain series too...
    https://www.cabelas.com/product/Cab...DRY-PLUS/1618375.uts?slotId=11#tabsCollection
    https://www.cabelas.com/product/Cab...acket-with-MOST-DRY-PLUS/1618370.uts?slotId=3


    Face it! I use blue jeans and tennis shoes when I've been hunting and have only run into problems ONCE while in Wyoming elk hunting with my tennis shoes w/wool socks.

    (5:00 mark)


    (2:15 mark)
     
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  7. iowaqdm

    iowaqdm PMA Member

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    You will normally not need heavy clothing in Idaho in mid September. You will likely be hunting in long sleeve t-shirt or light weight shirt most of the day. Might need light jacket in the morning but by 10 am you are usually down to a t-shirt. That is if you are moving to find elk. If you are stand hunting then you better pack a few layers. I have hunted central Idaho the same week your going and never had what I considered cold weather. Maybe got down to mid twenties at night and usually warmed up to 70+ degrees by noon. Had temps in the 80’s as well. You could get colder weather but I wouldn’t bet on it. Your biggest concern would be if for some reason you had a week of rain that you had try to hunt in. Get a good set of light weight rain gear and you can always layer under it. Doesn’t matter how good of shape you think your in when you get to 8000+ foot elevation and your climbing you will be plenty warm (and out of breath) even in a T-shirt at 50 degrees. You will be carrying a backpack and bow and normally way more gear than you will ever need. Idaho is straight up and down and absolutely beautiful. Now if your being guided and riding horses every day then you may need extra layers. Contact your outfitter and ask them about clothing and average temps. You will love Idaho. I preferred elk hunting in Idaho over Colorado. Only problem is the wolves are thick in some areas and have really hurt the elk and moose populations. Good luck. Feel free to PM if you have any other questions.
     
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  8. tyler883

    tyler883 Member

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    As of right now I'm planning on the midweight (fuse) base layers from first lite. I'm looking at the mountain pants from sitka and haven't decided on a jacket yet. The sitka stuff seems fairly water repellent. I'm going to pack my light weight rain gear that I use turkey hunting as a backup. I have spoken with the outfitter a few times on this subject and he says he will be wearing jeans and a tshirt!
     
  9. 2-bucks

    2-bucks Active Member

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    Your guide knows what he is talking about. If you have the urge to buy expensive cloths by all means go for it but you don't have to if you don't want to. Like others have said it is usually pretty warm in September but do be sure to have rain gear and the ability to layer up if it gets cold. Long Johns top and bottom (wool preferably), any camo or solid drab pants, shorts, good socks (wool preferably), light rain gear, long and short sleeve shirt, cold weather coat, and maybe a vest, light coat, or hoodie. Also a warm hat and mid-weight gloves. I hunt Idaho September 1-15. It can be 20-80F. I can sit in Iowa in my IWOM in 50F and not be hot but I can walk in the mountains in 50F in a long sleeve t-shirt and not be cold. None of my stuff is high end except the wool underwear. Sitka, first lite, Etc. is all nice stuff and may be worth every penny but it is not mandatory by any means. We pack in on foot for 3+ miles going from 7,500' to 9,000' so I'm taking as little of everything as I can get away with. I end up with about 60-65# counting my 7# pack. You may have more flexibility with the pack horses. Good luck, you are going to love it!
     

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