Too early for turnip and radish?

Discussion in 'Whitetail Management' started by loneranger, Jul 13, 2020.

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  1. loneranger

    loneranger Well-Known Member

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    Thanks but area is full of purslane weed too. Probably best to till the whole thing up again. Brass is struggling. sure wish it could rain. None in the future seen maybe into Sept?
     
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  3. Sligh1

    Sligh1 Administrator Staff Member

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    Purslane is a super low growing weed. If u have good brassica growth- I’d let it go.... it’ll outgrow & shade it out in a couple weeks. If u don’t - sure - got plenty time for dbltree cereal rye blend.
     
  4. deerdown

    deerdown Active Member

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    Radishes are up, but it's dry here in nw Missouri... Going to fill a few tanks of water and try to keep them alive...I only have a small strip of them between my clover and pumpkins... 20200815_155338.jpg
     
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  5. loneranger

    loneranger Well-Known Member

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    Yep pray for rain!!!!! Dry all over now
     
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  6. loneranger

    loneranger Well-Known Member

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    Update on my EARLY planting of Brassica. Guess I didnt plant it early enough. The dry hit my area begining of Aug. Was wet up until then. I dont have large plots. till them with a walk behind tiller. Two ft wide path. Brass was up but the drought slowed growth way down. In the mean time deer munched it all down. guess they were tired of beans across the road. So NO Brass this fall. Could till again . I have oat winter wheat and rye seed for mid Sept or even late Sept. But forecast looks dry all the way through Possibly Oct. The heat dome west,,has to be replaced by a cold trough for Iowa to ever get back into a wet pattern. Such is farming and food plotting. always a gamble.
     
  7. Sligh1

    Sligh1 Administrator Staff Member

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    Can broadcast a lot on top & that way u don’t lose all ur moisture to tillage & stir up weed seeds, etc. herbicide & spread.
     
  8. Thinkin Rut

    Thinkin Rut PMA Member

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    Do you get the same advantage of a red clover plow down if you kill it and let it lay on top? Another question...when is the very latest to plant brassicas?
     
  9. loneranger

    loneranger Well-Known Member

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    Broadcast on top. I know you have much much experience in plots, but I have tried that. Compared to working up the ground and seeding rye and oats to just broadcasting on top. Much better stand with tilling. Weeds no problem... Ground so dry no weeds. already killed them,tilled them. Only weed there is Purslane and even that is dried up!! Much depends on the weather. If this dry continues,,as some say it will,,,plots are just a waste of time. Thanks much for the advice though.!!
     
  10. deerdown

    deerdown Active Member

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    We got a couple very small rains, but turnips came up pretty good, I'm not dissatisfied with the bulbs on them.....we grabbed a half dozen to eat ourselves. 20201002_163334.jpg
     
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  11. loneranger

    loneranger Well-Known Member

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    Good for You!! I had a complete failure. nothing survived. My second attempt at rye and oats was OK, but I must have more deer around because they are keeping it mowed down quite short.? Usually I have to weed whip it to keep it down.??
     
  12. Hardwood11

    Hardwood11 It is going to be a good fall!

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    My brassicas were not the best but adequate 7275C8AA-8B43-48A1-A5EE-5E7815BED422.jpeg
     
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  13. deerdown

    deerdown Active Member

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  14. DMarley83

    DMarley83 DMARLEY83

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  15. DMarley83

    DMarley83 DMARLEY83

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    Do You have any pics of your plots?
     
  16. Oct-Lull

    Oct-Lull Active Member

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    Picture one is Aug 22nd. Planted no till much later than I would ordinarily plant brassicas but customer insisted.
    Picture two is Oct 3rd. First 3 weeks had very little rain, then a few good rains in Sept, no fertilizer was added. Surprising result to me, good size bulbs already.[​IMG][​IMG]

    Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
     
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  17. Daver

    Daver PMA Member

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    Great pics and a great demonstration of something that I say every year here on IW. While I do agree that in order to get the best turnip growth that the late July timeframe is the best to get your brassicas in the ground. It is certainly not "too late" to still get good growth(valuable food) planting yet well into August and even very early September. I don't get the least bit anxious if I don't get brassicas planted by say the third week of August.

    For me, and many others, moisture can be a limiter in late July/early August, and I would much rather get my brassicas in ahead of a rain(s) later, than in the dust early...only to sit for weeks waiting for a rain. While mid-to-late August planted turnips will not likely produce softball sized bulbs...you can still get plenty of food for the deers when planting in that window. Rains, rains are the key. Try hard to time your brassica plantings in front of the rain v. getting too locked in on the planting date...IMO.

    Your plot looks good...congrats!
     
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  18. Oct-Lull

    Oct-Lull Active Member

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    I am getting to be a big fan of what you stated above. Always was a proponent of early over later plantings. That moisture gap is a big deal. Even if you get germination right away then those little 1-2" plants starve for moisture for 3 weeks when they are most vulnerable. Those tiny seeds also can't handle dry very long especially if broadcast. Drilling definitely improved germination time and even without fertilizer the bulbs are over the size of baseballs with a few warm weeks left. Obviously year to year can vary but I would say all thru August its a viable option.

    Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
     
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