Whats a cure for cold feet?

Discussion in 'Iowa Whitetail Conference' started by jason, Dec 1, 2002.

  1. jason

    jason Guest

    I need to keep my feet warm. This past weekend when the wind was blowing 40 mph, and the timps in the mornging were mid teens to twenties weren't really kind to my feet. The rest of my body was fine, probably because im a big boy, have lots of natural insolation, but me feet were freezing. When I bought my boots, (Red Head bone dry) I didn't really think about hunting in Coldweather, and I know the worse is yet to come in late muzzle loader season. My boots have 400 grams of thin-sulate, I wear a pair of wool socks, and under them, a pair of regular socks, and it still doesn't do the trick. Buying a new pair of boots isn't an option now, but most definantly next season.
    Any tips or seggestions would help abunch before muzzle loader season arrives.

    Thanks and good hunting

    Jason V
     
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  3. Buckhunter

    Buckhunter New Member

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    Jason,
    Get rid of the cotton sock's and get a pair of polypropalyne sock's and then put a good pair of wool sock's over those and if it's real cold I'll put a set of toasty toe's in the mix.
    I wear laCrosse burly 800's when it's cold and they seem to work very well unless it's bitter outside.If I'm up and moving around my feet will stay warm all day.
    You never want to wear cotton because it hold's the moisture next to your skin and then you'll freeze your as$$ off for sure once your in your stand and the cold settle's in. [​IMG]
     
  4. GDCooper

    GDCooper New Member

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    Use an underliner sock that will wick moisture away, with a heavy sock over--wool or a high tech fiber, whichever you prefer. Definitely not cotton anywhere, since it absorbs and holds moisture. I wear Rocky boots with 1000 gram thinsulate over that "sock system", has kept my feet warm on stand all fall through some very cold mornings. So, that would be my recommendation, and think that less than 1000 gram thinsulate (800 might work) won't be enough if not moving around, regardless of what socks you wear. Hasn't been for my son with same socks or electric socks and boots with 400 grams of thinsulate (has been growing too fast to buy 1000 gr for up to now--will for his next pair now that his feet are bigger than mine!)

    Arctic boot covers are also supposed to work very well, although I don't have any personal experience. They're cheaper than new boots.
     
  5. deerbarber

    deerbarber Guest

    buy the little cold feet packs from walmart 4 pairs for 1.50. they really work put em in the end of your boot up where your toes are. i use the hand ones in my gloves as well.
     
  6. 191nt

    191nt Guest

    A little trick someone told me that works well while sitting in a tree stand.Cut the sleeves off a old camo sweatshirt or jacket,pull them over your boots and trim to fit.It works like the boot blanket or bears feet in catalogs.Combine this with the sock systems and heat packs and your set for a all day on stand.
     
  7. Daver

    Daver PMA Member

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    I would definitely echo the comments about poly-propylene socks next to the skin for starters. The other thought that I haven't seen mentioned here is this...

    Evaluate whether or not your hunting attire is constricting your blood flow to your feet. Nothing will cool you down quicker than not getting good blood flow to your extremities. A prime suspect area would be your pelvic region. If you are wearing jeans as opposed to sweatpants, which many people do, you may be cutting down your blood flow to your feet and legs when you sit down, etc.

    I always wear loose fitting sweatpants and oversized outer hunting pants. I may look like the Pillsbury dough boy, but I never get cold either. When it is colder I make sure to have a polypro layer next to the skin too.

    Also, I normally don't dress until I am in my stand or sometimes I will dress a 100 yards away or so. If you get all heated up getting to your stand and then sit you will end up cold within about 45 minutes. Good luck and be glad you don't live in Canada!!
     
  8. Daver

    Daver PMA Member

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    I would definitely echo the comments about poly-propylene socks next to the skin for starters. The other thought that I haven't seen mentioned here is this...

    Evaluate whether or not your hunting attire is constricting your blood flow to your feet. Nothing will cool you down quicker than not getting good blood flow to your extremities. A prime suspect area would be your pelvic region. If you are wearing jeans as opposed to sweatpants, which many people do, you may be cutting down your blood flow to your feet and legs when you sit down, etc.

    I always wear loose fitting sweatpants and oversized outer hunting pants. I may look like the Pillsbury dough boy, but I never get cold either. When it is colder I make sure to have a polypro layer next to the skin too.

    Also, I normally don't dress until I am in my stand or sometimes I will dress a 100 yards away or so. If you get all heated up getting to your stand and then sit you will end up cold within about 45 minutes. Good luck and be glad you don't live in Canada!!
     
  9. OLETOM

    OLETOM New Member

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    Scanned though this topic real fast but did not see it mentioned. I too wear the La Crosse Burlies but if it is going to be extremely cold, I will put a hand warmer in the bottom of each boot. Also put a couple down the back of my shirt (not next to the skin) near my kidneys. It will keep you warm, almost make you to warm for the entire stand. Take a needle and thread and put a couple button up pockets where you kidneys would be then they wont slide around or have a buddy pin them to your back side for you before slipping everything else on.

    Hope this helps.
     
  10. Jake

    Jake Member

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    I agree with many of the replies as to using polypropolyne socks. As well I wear Lacrose Ice man boots they also make an Ice King boot that is very warm they are very heavy to walk in but they will keep your feet warm!!
     
  11. Shooter

    Shooter Guest

    The best solution.
    A little secret. The best way to keep your feet warm on long days in the stand. Use rubber tingly overboots with shoes. Thay cut back on smell and keep my feet toasty. They are also very quiet, while walking. I usally use typical leather boots when walking, but for warmth you can't beat tingly's. Try it and you won't be disappointed.
     
  12. snowgoose6

    snowgoose6 Guest

    Shooter [​IMG] what is a Tingley,s Boot
     
  13. Shooter

    Shooter Guest

    SNOW GOOSE

    A tingly is a rubber boot you can find at any farm supply type store. My Father is a vet and uses them a lot with livestock checks. They're fairly cheap. You would use them with regular shoes. They wear right below your knees. But they prevent all wind penetration and you can get more insulation with them. I advise getting a larger than normal pair. and a large pair of tennyshoes. As long as you don't cutt circulation they will work awsome.
    Use a little talcum to get them over your shoes. otherwise you'll have a heck of a time getting them off. try them they are cheap and very effective. I really like using them while I'm sitting. Big timberland thinsilate ...... boots do fine if your somewhat active, but for long periods of sitting I highly recommend tingly's. I can alsmost garantee you be happy. I never believed it. I finally tried it because my dad always used them. I just wasn't a believer until I used them.
    Let me know if this does work
     
  14. snowgoose6

    snowgoose6 Guest

    Shooter you have to be kidding me light rubber boots and tennis shoes. I will give it a try thanks Jim [​IMG]
     
  15. ODOC

    ODOC Guest

    JASON: Did not see this above so - - remember that cold feet indicate not enough heat in the system, and that you lose most of your heat from your HEAD. Be sure that you are not losing it there, even if you have to remove some of it when the deer drive starts coming thru. Scarves with heavy sock-masks help a lot.

    Some of my friends swear by the battery-powered socks. I have them but have not used them - - kinda holding them in reserve for REALLY cold days, but I also have surplus mickey mouse boots that work for me down to 50 below.

    One other possible: check at the army surplus stores and see if they have any Air Force MukLuks which are canvas, knee-high, with a rubber sole and felt liners like Shoe-pacs have. Excellent, expecially if not stomping thru water. If so, apply tent sealer first to the seams.

    All of those other ideas are good - FOR SURE wear clothes lose enough to assure good circulation to the lower parts.

    LEN
     
  16. Shooter

    Shooter Guest

    Snow goose

    be sure to wear a good pair of socks and shoes.
    It sounds bad but it works for me. They about 10$ for a pair.
     

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