• Dear User,

    We had issues in getting your old password work with the new version of the software, henceforth kindly Reset Your Password here

    You won't be able to login with your old password

    If you do not receive the Password reset request within a few minutes, please check your Junk / Spam E-mail folder just in case the email got delivered there instead of your inbox. If so, select Not Junk, which will allow future messages to get through.

    If you still need assistance, email [email protected]

    We appreciate your patience and understanding on this matter.

Buck Hollow Sporting Goods - click or touch to visit their website Hunterra - Custom Hunting Property Maps

Bigger antlers in years with right weather ....

203ntyp

PMA Member
It’s been said that antler growth starts immediately after shed. I’ve seen several bucks carry very late, like to mid april. So if growth starts at time of shed, does an early shed buck stand a chance to put on more inches than say a late shedding buck? Stands to reason that it would to me, but I’ve never seen this discussed.
I can only attest to knowing of one buck that shed in early May just after soybeans where planted and then found while harvesting the beans in early November. His sheds where 83 & 86", he was harvested 4 days after his sheds where found and was over 200". Sounds incredible that a buck can grow antlers that quickly but they can if having the right food, genetics and age. The proof is hanging on my wall with his sheds :D
 

Sligh1

Administrator
Staff member
It’s been said that antler growth starts immediately after shed. I’ve seen several bucks carry very late, like to mid april. So if growth starts at time of shed, does an early shed buck stand a chance to put on more inches than say a late shedding buck? Stands to reason that it would to me, but I’ve never seen this discussed.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
That could be right. But - one other big part of that….
Early shed deer are often times stressed. Or when many shed early - the herd is experiencing more stress. Could be hard winter, too many deer & too little food. Or it could be a very hard rut for the bucks. Lots of things.
when shed late- healthier & less stress. See this on mild winters or lower population areas.

the “regrowth” is happening in the skeletal structures before antlers grow. Feb, March, April on…. Bucks are building up skeletal nutrients, antler nutrients & also building their bodies back.

longer winter- bit harsh. One drought about 3 weeks or so but otherwise things look really good. We got great rain this last week!!! This next few weeks is some major growth!
 

hillrunner

PMA Member
It’s been said that antler growth starts immediately after shed. I’ve seen several bucks carry very late, like to mid april. So if growth starts at time of shed, does an early shed buck stand a chance to put on more inches than say a late shedding buck? Stands to reason that it would to me, but I’ve never seen this discussed.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
I have no idea but I've often wondered this. I've seen bucks in mid April with a couple inches of new growth walking with bucks still carrying.
 

Wi transplant

PMA Member
Ok I have read all the great comments here! Got me thinking the would a supplemental feeding program (where legal) yr round outside of hunting seasons make a huge impact on the bucks in your hunting area? Correct me please if I'm wrong but here in iowa I believe we can feed outside of the deer seasons? Oct1 through Jan 10th is a no no but Jan 11th through Sept is ok? So especially Jan 11th through Aug would a good feeding program add some nice inches and extras to the bucks in an area? Anyone doing or have tried this ? Looking for input/results? Thanks

Sent from my SM-G973U using Tapatalk
 

Tmayer13

PMA Member
Ok I have read all the great comments here! Got me thinking the would a supplemental feeding program (where legal) yr round outside of hunting seasons make a huge impact on the bucks in your hunting area? Correct me please if I'm wrong but here in iowa I believe we can feed outside of the deer seasons? Oct1 through Jan 10th is a no no but Jan 11th through Sept is ok? So especially Jan 11th through Aug would a good feeding program add some nice inches and extras to the bucks in an area? Anyone doing or have tried this ? Looking for input/results? Thanks

Sent from my SM-G973U using Tapatalk
I know several guys here that feed mineral all year outside of hunting season. there are alot of debates on this. A wild buck will actually get most of its genetic potential from the Mother and her nutrients and feed habits will affect the growth of her buck fawn. So the mineral you are feeding here in IA for instance, it would take years for it to make a HUGE difference. Will it make some immediately, from all the research that I have read and heard NO. But I suppose you have to start sometime if thats the road you want to take.

Take georgia for instance. They do not have near the browse and food that we have here in IA. So the antlers just dont grow as big. But you cannot just add a mineral site down there and expect the antlers the next year to be large, its just genetically not possible(in the wild).
But i do know there have been some tests done down south where they took an adult doe and started to feed her correctly, corn, clover, basically the stuff we have here and she never produced a large buck.
Then they took a doe fawn, began feeding her immediately all the good stuff. And after her 3rd breeding season she began to produced larger antlered animals...all of this was because they basically broke the genetic cycle.

I hope some of this makes sense. Basically what I am saying is that if you put out supplemental feeding you cannot expect that it is just going to grow large antler bucks, you have to basically get into new genetic cycles for it to work like that....
 

Wi transplant

PMA Member
I know several guys here that feed mineral all year outside of hunting season. there are alot of debates on this. A wild buck will actually get most of its genetic potential from the Mother and her nutrients and feed habits will affect the growth of her buck fawn. So the mineral you are feeding here in IA for instance, it would take years for it to make a HUGE difference. Will it make some immediately, from all the research that I have read and heard NO. But I suppose you have to start sometime if thats the road you want to take.

Take georgia for instance. They do not have near the browse and food that we have here in IA. So the antlers just dont grow as big. But you cannot just add a mineral site down there and expect the antlers the next year to be large, its just genetically not possible(in the wild).
But i do know there have been some tests done down south where they took an adult doe and started to feed her correctly, corn, clover, basically the stuff we have here and she never produced a large buck.
Then they took a doe fawn, began feeding her immediately all the good stuff. And after her 3rd breeding season she began to produced larger antlered animals...all of this was because they basically broke the genetic cycle.

I hope some of this makes sense. Basically what I am saying is that if you put out supplemental feeding you cannot expect that it is just going to grow large antler bucks, you have to basically get into new genetic cycles for it to work like that....
Ok so why does everyone feel a good wet growing season produces bigger bucks that season? My feeling is in years of poor natural browse and early in spring it would have to help out ?

Sent from my SM-G973U using Tapatalk
 

Tmayer13

PMA Member
Ok so why does everyone feel a good wet growing season produces bigger bucks that season? My feeling is in years of poor natural browse and early in spring it would have to help out ?

Sent from my SM-G973U using Tapatalk
i do not have any research info about wet and dry years....i was solely citing what I heard from I think it was Dr Strickland...(I think but could have another well known guy)...My true feeling is a wetter growing season produces constant regrowth of natural browse which in turn has more nutrients to help grow larger deer both antler and body size.

And what i think your saying is that on poorer growing years a mineral site would help out better than no mineral site at all?
I am no biologist by any means but I would say sure it could help but because of the poor growing year it only helps make up what should normally be there, but no mineral(in wild, not talking HGH they give penned deer) will still be better than what mother nature has to offer...
 

Wi transplant

PMA Member
i do not have any research info about wet and dry years....i was solely citing what I heard from I think it was Dr Strickland...(I think but could have another well known guy)...My true feeling is a wetter growing season produces constant regrowth of natural browse which in turn has more nutrients to help grow larger deer both antler and body size.

And what i think your saying is that on poorer growing years a mineral site would help out better than no mineral site at all?
I am no biologist by any means but I would say sure it could help but because of the poor growing year it only helps make up what should normally be there, but no mineral(in wild, not talking HGH they give penned deer) will still be better than what mother nature has to offer...
I'm talking full supplemental feeding like some of the full feeds the deer breeders use ? Purina ect. Or a nice mix of corn soybeans sunflowers ect. Accessible free choice when ever they want it? Plus mineral available. Just wondering if that would unlock the potential on some deer?

Sent from my SM-G973U using Tapatalk
 

JNRBRONC

Moderator
I'm talking full supplemental feeding like some of the full feeds the deer breeders use ? Purina ect. Or a nice mix of corn soybeans sunflowers ect. Accessible free choice when ever they want it? Plus mineral available. Just wondering if that would unlock the potential on some deer?

Sent from my SM-G973U using Tapatalk
If you can afford to offer what the deer breeders use, I'm sure it would add some inches. I'm not sure if that feed would have free range deer live next to it and seek it out (farmed deer are in pens, so they are forced to eat it). If you have a property where bachelor groups hang out naturally during the spring/summer, you might be able to grow bigger deer. Your neighbors will thank you. ;)
 

bwese

Active Member
I have no doubt weather influences horn development/deer health. I look at habitat management as trying to give the does the best nutrition possible throughout the year via mineral, supplemental feeding from Jan- July( treated corn/mixed feed with ivermectin for tic infestations, they look like bunches of grapes on does, fawns, and bucks) and various food plots.

The deer had horrible ticks a month ago and now they look clean. The benefits of ivermectin go to the fawns via doe milk according to my vet friend.

Take care of the does/fawns the bucks will have better chance of reaching potential when they live long enough.
 

Bassattackr

Active Member
the thing I notice the most is the rain. When we get good spring and summer rains is when I see the most growth.

Agree 1000%. Last year was a very wet spring and summer and I had some of the best young bucks I've ever seen on the farm. Most yearlings were all 7 or 8 pointers, only a couple of forked bucks. I had 5 different 2 year olds that were the best I've seen in my area. Several 120" range typical 8s (including a super wide one), a crabclaw 9, a double crab claw buck and nice typical 10 point.

After this spring being similar weather wise, I'm hoping for another great year. I already have the wide 8 point (now heavier 3 year old) returned on camera, and he gained quite a bit. Looking good so far..
 

Bassattackr

Active Member
Got me thinking the would a supplemental feeding program (where legal) yr round outside of hunting seasons make a huge impact on the bucks in your hunting area?

I've often thought about the same, more in regard to mineral however. What if we spread minerals like fertilizer in our foodplots? Especially in those CWD areas (I'm in central MO) where you can't have a mineral "spot" ? Seems they would be absorbed by the plants and that much more nutrient dense for wildlife?
 

Sligh1

Administrator
Staff member
I've often thought about the same, more in regard to mineral however. What if we spread minerals like fertilizer in our foodplots? Especially in those CWD areas (I'm in central MO) where you can't have a mineral "spot" ? Seems they would be absorbed by the plants and that much more nutrient dense for wildlife?
A couple companies do this. I’m sure certain plants can uptake a good bit of this. I’m not certain either but I think it’s great idea.

no one will convince me minerals don’t work. Sorry. Just my own observations & discussing mineral benefits with veterinarians, cattle folks, deer breeders, etc. The soil does not always have the proper nutrients. That’s just a fact. Deer feed on mineral for a reason & gives them the nutrients they are lacking. Go down the list… & research the benefits. Or the downside of not having or low levels of…. Vit D & B, calcium, phosphorus, potassium, selenium, cobalt, iron, etc etc. Just like a human- if u are lacking on nutrients you have “problems” & doctors are often involved to correct those imbalances. Am I telling anyone to feed mineral? NOPE. I’m simply stating - IMO - it’s BS to say they don’t have vast benefits.

SO FAR - from the few deer I’ve caught back up with …. I’d say the growing year is VERY GOOD!!! Jury was out & I guess still is on some deer…. But in my area- excellent so far. We need to dodge the EHD bullet across the Midwest next!!!
 

Bassattackr

Active Member
no one will convince me minerals don’t work. Sorry. Just my own observations & discussing mineral benefits with veterinarians, cattle folks, deer breeders, etc. The soil does not always have the proper nutrients. That’s just a fact. Deer feed on mineral for a reason & gives them the nutrients they are lacking. Go down the list… & research the benefits. Or the downside of not having or low levels of…. Vit D & B, calcium, phosphorus, potassium, selenium, cobalt, iron, etc etc. Just like a human- if u are lacking on nutrients you have “problems” & doctors are often involved to correct those imbalances. Am I telling anyone to feed mineral? NOPE. I’m simply stating - IMO - it’s BS to say they don’t have vast benefits.

I’ve come to the same conclusion over time, I might go the “fertilizer” route and spread over the top when I plant.

Years ago there was Antler Dirt, not sure what ever happened to them. RWW has a mineral line, something for the EHD crowd as well I think..
 

IowaBowHunter1983

Super Moderator
Staff member
Spring is def late this year. I am sitting here pondering if it will have an affect on antler growth. Having established early producers like clover should be helpful.

Thoughts?
 

Buckscrape

Active Member
From a far north perspective (a lot probably won't apply to anyone that salutes the red white and blue ):
An early spring is Very important for good antler growth and we're pretty late up here. Minerals and nutritional value of browse is also necessary. And this might be where we differ from the State of Iowa ; we get our best antler growth in the drought years, and here's why. Our deer will always have enough to eat in a Saskatchewan summer/fall and in a drought what they eat is packed with way more nutrition, especially protein, than in a wet year.
 
Top Bottom