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Bucksnbears

Well-Known Member
Had a landowner call me and was wondering if I was still bowhunting his ground.
I said I haven't for several years.
Asked why?, he said he has so many deer and wants some dead!
He owns about 300 acres along a great rivebottom.
I have so many private (free) acres to hunt there is no way I can hunt it all in a year.
90% riverbottom land.
Miles and miles of it!
He said not one person has asked him to hunt it in years.
I told him I'd make a phone call to a guy with kids that ,as be interested.
I did and now they have a superb place to hunt.
I truly feel for you guys that struggle to find a place to hunt.
I remember 30 years ago, I could hunt 60 miles (as the crow flys), a riverbottom without a problem. Very few exceptions.
Hell, a neighbor of mine has a few miles of great riverbottom ground that puts up signs that say, "hunters welcome", but walking only.
Nobody even hunt it?
I wrote on one of his signs with a sharpie, " thanks "%/#", very kind of you.
 

bwese

Active Member
That was very nice of you and I'm sure the new hunters really appreciate it (they better). What you describe in your whole story is unheard of in this day and age. I don't know anybody that can get on private land without having an in/in depth connection of some sort.

Thanks for helping out that family.
 

Obsessed

Well-Known Member
Had a landowner call me and was wondering if I was still bowhunting his ground.
I said I haven't for several years.
Asked why?, he said he has so many deer and wants some dead!
He owns about 300 acres along a great rivebottom.
I have so many private (free) acres to hunt there is no way I can hunt it all in a year.
90% riverbottom land.
Miles and miles of it!
He said not one person has asked him to hunt it in years.
I told him I'd make a phone call to a guy with kids that ,as be interested.
I did and now they have a superb place to hunt.
I truly feel for you guys that struggle to find a place to hunt.
I remember 30 years ago, I could hunt 60 miles (as the crow flys), a riverbottom without a problem. Very few exceptions.
Hell, a neighbor of mine has a few miles of great riverbottom ground that puts up signs that say, "hunters welcome", but walking only.
Nobody even hunt it?
I wrote on one of his signs with a sharpie, " thanks "%/#", very kind of you.
Thanks for doing the right thing. I imagine many would hold onto ground rights if found in that same situation. Sorry to hear about your shrank Peter... ;)
 

Sligh1

Administrator
Staff member
That’s awesome!!!!! Someone hit the hunting lottery from your good deed!! Memories to be made!!!

Side note: Here’s what jumps into my head when I hear that no one has asked him,…. A new generation that probably is lacking “social skills” & real interactions with people. I wonder if the days of “knocking on doors” - FACE TO FACE are slowing? Wonder if it’s more common to post “hunting land wanted” online & do letters? Maybe I’m way off. Who knows. My gut tells me…. The younger guys willing to knock on some doors still have a lot of opportunity. Maybe more with time???

Hope that lucky hunter sends you some success pics in the future!
 

Bucksnbears

Well-Known Member
Dang Skip, you may be onto something with the "social " thing?

I've had my ground for 12 or 13 years and have only been asked 1 time..
I have to ask some to come hunt and do every year.
 

CurtisWalker

Moderator
Hard to get permission knocking on doors too. I have more luck with letters than door knocking


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

CurtisWalker

Moderator
I can't even imagine this?
A "can I hunt your land" letter would end in the trash.
I believe in first impressions. Seldom wrong.

It’s a strange world nowadays. You gotta put time and effort into your letter, it’s not a five sentence thing asking permission. Mine is two pages long. I’ve even been thanked for writing and not knocking. Do I still knock on doors? All the time. Almost weekly. Do I get lots of no’s? 99% of the time.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

ColoredRed24

New Member
I have a situation that is kind of different. I am hunting some public in Boone County along the river however I am worried that if I get a shot the deer will most likely head toward the private land that is next to it.
I found the persons name and address through Beacon however they live almost 1.5 hours from this area.
Would sending a letter asking to speak with them be sufficient? Or would you just make the drive to hopefully be able to talk to someone?
I would like to ask permission to track that animal onto the private land. (I know there is some controversy about what is legal and not, with/without permission)

Also wondering how do you guys ask for permission when knocking on doors? I am a younger hunting with no one in my family to "show me the ropes". Hoping to get more land access up around here as the only private that I am access to is in Lee County, SE Iowa.

Thanks for any information!!
 

Bucksnbears

Well-Known Member
I must me "likeable" lol.
I Do try to at least try to get to know (even just abit) the landowners ahead of time.
I have many acres of prime private acres to hunt. Most of it solo.
Aint as greedy as I was when younger.
 

newfarmer

Member
It’s a strange world nowadays. You gotta put time and effort into your letter, it’s not a five sentence thing asking permission. Mine is two pages long. I’ve even been thanked for writing and not knocking. Do I still knock on doors? All the time. Almost weekly. Do I get lots of no’s? 99% of the time.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Ive done the letter thing with a lot more success than a person thinks. Door knocking, you have to guarantee its the owner you are talking to, I have seen that play out far to many times that a renter gives permission to the "back 80" and trouble arises (I think its better now with the vast amount of resources to look at).
The last piece I ended up asking and receiving permission to shed hunt was actually a neighbors piece, but neighbor lives states away and I couldnt pull a definite address. Was able to look them up on FB, drop them a lengthy message and asked if I would be able to call them to discuss further, and ended up getting access. They only show up once a year, and now I am the care taker for their farm/house/everything. There is a definite shift in how to ask and gain permission I think...
 

CurtisWalker

Moderator
I have a situation that is kind of different. I am hunting some public in Boone County along the river however I am worried that if I get a shot the deer will most likely head toward the private land that is next to it.
I found the persons name and address through Beacon however they live almost 1.5 hours from this area.
Would sending a letter asking to speak with them be sufficient? Or would you just make the drive to hopefully be able to talk to someone?
I would like to ask permission to track that animal onto the private land. (I know there is some controversy about what is legal and not, with/without permission)

Also wondering how do you guys ask for permission when knocking on doors? I am a younger hunting with no one in my family to "show me the ropes". Hoping to get more land access up around here as the only private that I am access to is in Lee County, SE Iowa.

Thanks for any information!!

It’s completely legal to track an animal onto a piece of private if you have blood. Just leave your weapon at the fence. I try to be courteous and ask but sometimes it’s better of just going without then knowing.

When I knock, I try to introduce myself and give them some background on me. Ask for permission and try to be specific on the type of hunting I’ll be doing.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Bucksnbears

Well-Known Member
Talked to an older fella today.
He has a sheetrock lift I asked to borrow.
No problem.
He lives on a dead end road and has 120 acres the butts up to a deer refuge.
Supreme deer area. Neighbor shot a 180ish last year.
I asked him if he's been seeing much for deer.
Response was " yep, lots. Wanna come and shoot some"
Good God.., I already have more then I can hunt in a year.
(Grin).
 
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