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Spraying glyphosate after NWSG burn on 2-20-21 in Auburn, AL (zone 8a)

FarmerCharlie

New Member
We did a prescribed burn on my native grass field today. Would it be a good idea to spray glyphosate on the cool-season grasses and weeds that remained after the burn?
The three images below are
1) an area that I had been using as a path through the field
2) a closeup of the same area
3) a closeup in a different area.
I'm not too good at identifying grasses and weeds.
I also have some areas where Bermuda had encroached, but that seems to have decreased the last couple of years as the NWSG has grown.

If it's a reasonable thing to do now, should I spot spray the green areas or just go over the entire field?

Thanks,

Charlie.

1)
20210220_150403_HS.jpg

2)
20210220_150412_HS.jpg

3)
20210220_151632_HS.jpg
 

Sligh1

Administrator
Staff member
Yes. If the cool seasons & junk are actively growing & warm seasons are dormant. I have to imagine that’s the case in AL. Spray away. 2,4-d may be nice lil addition as well.

what native grass species are there? u got pre-emergent options depending on what’s there. Most likely imazapic (plateau, journey, panoramic)
 

FarmerCharlie

New Member
I originally planted big bluestem, little bluestem, and Indian grass, but there is a lot of what looks like bushy bluestem too. I also saw hundreds of sweet gum saplings that I had not noticed before the burn. We spent yesterday pulling them with an extractigator. I'm thinking of going ahead with the glyphosate now and maybe imazapic later. Does that sound like a plan?

This is what the field looked like last September.20200918_123117_hs.jpg
 
Last edited:

Sligh1

Administrator
Staff member
I originally planted big bluestem, little bluestem, and Indian grass, but there is a lot of what looks like bushy bluestem too. I also saw hundreds of sweet gum saplings that I had not noticed before the burn. We spent yesterday pulling them with an extractigator. I'm thinking of going ahead with the glyphosate now and maybe imazapic later. Does that sound like a plan?

This is what the field looked like last September.View attachment 120590
Very nice. I think so yes. U could combine the 2 for same spraying. If cost is not an issue- run high rate imazapic... I believe the max labeled rate is 16 oz to the acre. Been some university studies that showed better results with 32 oz but I don’t think labeled that high & that’s getting lil pricey.
 

FarmerCharlie

New Member
Thanks. I had also planted some wildflowers and forbs, but I decided last year to sacrifice them to try to eliminate a lot of dogfennel and briars with 2-4D and Remedy. If the dog fennel and briars don't come back this spring, then maybe I can overseed with some forbs and wildflowers. I only have about 5 acres in NWSG, but I'm working towards another few acres, It was worth all the trouble and expense when a couple of years ago I was sitting by the frog pond and heard a sound I had not heard in 70 years.
 

Sligh1

Administrator
Staff member
Above is Great pic & sound!!!!
If u use imazapic/plateau, u can seed forbs like Illinois bundleflower, partridge pea, purple prairie clover, purple cone flower, etc. read the label- it may be your best friend for keeping some of others out. Probably the best “crp-like” herbicide a person could dream up. A nice solid list of forbs & native grasses & keeps out piles of junk folks don’t want.

 
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