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Whats tough enough for....

newfarmer

Member
So I have several "trails" that cut around our property, mainly for UTV, walking, small utility tractor, nothing big or excessive either. Figured I really would like to maximize the area and plant clovers on these trails. Is it tough enough to handle traffic, not regular traffic, just the occasional- or is there something better that I should use for that? I guess I just want to make sure I can get the deer some extra choices, and if I forget to mow it, not have it go crazy on me. Any insight would be great. Thanks
 

Bassattackr

Well-Known Member
How much sun does it get? My existing logging road is mostly shady so I just leave it be. The occasional moss and grass patch here is all that remains. I keep clear of leaves for sound purposes.

You could use a perennial clover (like ladino, Alice, etc) that takes occasional traffic well..

But personally, from a hunting standpoint, I don’t like to put food on my access routes. You’re then walking through “food plots” to get to your stand locations. If it does get enough sun, this is maybe the only instance on the entire farm where I would use something like perennial ryegrass or even fescue (gasp!) if you have a lot of mud or moisture issues.
 

newfarmer

Member
How much sun does it get? My existing logging road is mostly shady so I just leave it be. The occasional moss and grass patch here is all that remains. I keep clear of leaves for sound purposes.

You could use a perennial clover (like ladino, Alice, etc) that takes occasional traffic well..

But personally, from a hunting standpoint, I don’t like to put food on my access routes. You’re then walking through “food plots” to get to your stand locations. If it does get enough sun, this is maybe the only instance on the entire farm where I would use something like perennial ryegrass or even fescue (gasp!) if you have a lot of mud or moisture issues.
Most of the trails I wouldnt necessarily say are access routes for any stands/hunting. Just the wife on her occasional joy rides/walks around. Just mainly trying to help get more food into the area in all maximum space versus opening up more woods/clear cuts to plant a food plot. I am on 17 acres, so space utilization is more important I guess- the deer stare into the kitchen window and watch us, the daughter loves it, so just trying to maximize it for her.
Some of the trails get almost full sun all day, some pry get 4-5 hours, one of the trails gets about 2... so a bit scattered throughout...
 

Sligh1

Administrator
Staff member
Agree with all of above. Tree roots will be a challenge with moisture but if u don’t mind reseeding it - be ok. Just for fun u could try some red clover, high traffic grazing alfalfa, etc. Alice white sure Is hardy too like bassattackr said. & agree with food plots on trails. But if that’s no issue - then do food. Clover varieties …. If those fail????? …. Maybe a cereal rye mix drilled in each year & keep trying clovers. Almost has to be clovers & just keep at em if they die out on tough years.
 

crietveld

Active Member
Is there some grass on the trails now? If so just mow it a couple times a year and it should thicken up. Overseed or frost seed clover into it but in my experience the clover dies out in a couple years.

I bushhog the trails through my timber and they have good grass cover on them. I’m always amazed how green the ground cover in the timber stays in a drought, my open areas get brown and crispy and the timber stays lush green.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

jkratz5

Super Moderator
Have a pretty shady logging road on one of my properties here. We throw clover down every couple years. Tends to take in random spots, since it is 1/2 mile long we get plenty of food out of it. You will definitely need to reseed much more than a standard plot, maybe yearly but it is pretty cheap seed
 

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