Apple/Pear Trees

Discussion in 'Dbltree's corner' started by Outdoor Family, Dec 29, 2006.

  1. Outdoor Family

    Outdoor Family New Member

    Messages:
    91
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Lucas Iowa
    Where is a good place to order apple and pear trees for the south central area??? Anyone ever order trees from the National Arbor Day foundation??? Would like to get some ordered for a spring planting...
    Thanks
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 2, 2010
  2. AdBot Guest Advertisement

  3. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

    Messages:
    9,446
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    SE Iowa
    Fruit Tree sources

    Apples and pears are just a lot of fun and you can plant a couple every year without breaking the bank and eventually end up with a great attraction! Here's a list of fruit tree sources

    Adams County Nursery

    Century Farm Orchards

    Cummins Nursery

    Burnt Ridge Nursery

    St. Lawrence Nursery

    MILLER NURSERIES

    Stark Bro's Nurseries and Orchards Co.

    Raintree Nursery

    Grandpa's Orchards

    Burgess Seed and Plant

    Red Fern Farm

    Morse Nursery

    Edward Fort Nurseries

    The Wildlife Group

    Vintage Virginia Apples

    Boyer Nurseries & Orchards, Inc

    Trees of Antiquity

    Gurney's Nursery

    Arbor Day Foundation

    NAFEX Nursery/Supply Source Lists

    Tree Selection

    Which tree is right for you? Standard, semi-dwarf or dwarf?

    Most landowners planting for wildlife prefer semi-dwarf but here are a few links to help you deicde what is best for you.

    Guide for Home Orchards

    Dwarf versus Semi-Dwarf versus Standard Trees

    WHICH APPLES SHOULD I CHOOSE?

    All about Apples

    It's all about the rootstocks:

    Dwarf rootstocks are not as strong as semi or standard but you can fence them and stake them of course.

    For best results order trees on M7 or M111 rootstock, they produce a strong, sturdy, freestanding tree that is winter hardy and tolerant of a variety of soil conditions. All apple trees (fruit trees) are grafted to various rootstocks and we need to match the rootstock to the soil/growing conditions in our areas and soil types.

    M111 rootstock is a slightly larger rootstock that works well in the heavy clay soils in my area and works much better then dwarf rootstock.

    Here's some basic rootstock info from Adams County Nursery

    Top 6 Apple Varieties for Whitetails and Wildlife

    Honeycrisp:
    Extremely winter hardy to -40F. Bears fruit at a very young age and produces heavy annual crops at 5 years.

    Liberty:
    Hardy, vigorous and spurred (fruit buds develop along the shorter lateral branches along the limbs). Liberty blooms early in the season so is susceptible to late season frost. Fruit stays on the tree well after maturity and has very heavy annual bearing habit. Less cold tolerance than Honeycrisp (-20F).

    Honeygold:
    Produces a large yellow apple that is highly preferred by deer. Somewhat bi-annual (alternates years of strong and weak crops) if heavy crop years are not hand thinned. Very winter hardy, early producer and holds apples well.

    Enterprise:
    Extreme resistance to most major apple diseases. Blooms much later than Liberty and thus is less likely to experience late frost damage.

    Jonafree:
    A very firm, scab-resistant variety that tends to be small but bears very well. Cold tolerant to -20F.

    Empire:
    Susceptible to scab but serves as a good pollinator. Ripens in mid-October in northern Vermont. The apple remains firm and stays very well on the tree. Not recommended for warmer, humid regions due to its susceptibility to scab

    Grimes Golden - Ripens Sept./Oct.

    Rome - Ripens Sept./Oct.

    Stayman Winesap - Ripens Oct.

    Blacktwig - Ripens November

    York - Ripens in Oct.

    This is a list of Disease Resistant Varieties in order of Ripening (Early to Late) that ACN carries


    This list is in order of ripening, early to late

    Apple Pollinizers available from ACN

    General information on apple varieties:

    Apples and More

    Apple Varieties

    All about apples


    Pears
    Adams County Nursery also has pear trees and remember Asian pears tend to mature much later in the fall and are also more disease resistant.


    Just make sure you fence them! Apple tree Cages

    [​IMG]

    I plant most of mine in my backyard...because, well...I hunt in my backyard! :D

    Planting and soil preperation

    The following link covers most of what you'll need to prepare for your new apple trees.

    Planting & Growing Apple Trees

    Growing Apple Trees In The Home Garden

    Apple tree growing Information

    Care of the Mature Backyard Apple Tree

    Adams County Nursery - Fruit Tree Planting Guide

    Some advice from apple expert Ben from the QDMA forums



    Fertilizer and Lime

    First off I added lime and fertlizer...lime was $3.60 a bag and 10-10-10 fertilizer was $8.50 (20# bags) at Menards just for a reference. Not a big investment to keep trees healthy and growing.

    [​IMG]

    I used my tree planting spud to loosen and open up ground around the drip line of the tree.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    I used a small coffee can and put about a 1.5 to 2#' of triple 10 around each tree and about 5#'s of pell lime around each tree.

    [​IMG]

    The lime I scattered in the trench pockets and all over the surface area as well and then raked it in lightly and covered the pockets to bury the fertilizer.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Fertilizing Tree Fruits

    Fertilizing Apple Trees

    Fertilizer Stakes

    Assorted Fertilizers

    Root Feed for fruit Trees

    Fertilizing Fruit Trees

    Training and staking

    Training and Pruning Apple Trees - Cornell Guide 112

    Training and Pruning Your Home Orchard

    Cotton string comes in handy

    [​IMG]

    To tie limbs horizontally which strengthens the limb joint so that it won't be so apt to break under the weight of heavy fruit.

    I tied square knots to create a loop so that the string won't tighten and girdle a limb

    [​IMG]

    Leaving the tree looking something like this (NOTE- DO NOT use tubes!! I removed these and replaced with alum. window screen)

    [​IMG]

    There are many options including using commercial limb spreaders, toothpicks and clothespins all of which can be found in this link on Training and pruning apple trees

    I nipped off suckers sprouting up from the base area

    [​IMG]

    and installed plastic tree protectors and tied the tree to the stake for support. (use fine wire screen instead!!)

    [​IMG]

    After doing this I was advised that aluminum window screen makes a better guard because it can breath yet protect. Borers get behind the plastic guards and then can kill the tree so I will pick up some screen and use that along with plastic tie's in the future.

    A friend stopped by today who had this exact problem last year...borers killed one of his trees after moths got behind the plastic protector and he is also using screen now which enables one to spray insecticide through as well... ;)

    Staking the tree for support against wind is important

    [​IMG]

    1/2 conduit seems to be the best choice using care not to bend it when driving it in.

    One needs to remove all double leaders to encourage one central leader and then support it via the conduit or a set of wires running between posts (or trellis of some kind)

    I fasten the name tags to the posts so I can remember what is what and keep a record on paper in a file as well.

    [​IMG]

    Here's what we need to replace the plastic protectors (that encourage apple moths/borers) with...

    Aluminum window screen...I bought this 28" for .79 cents a foot and used a foot per tree

    [​IMG]

    Staple the top shut

    [​IMG]

    Staple the sides shut as well

    [​IMG]

    Make sure the bottom is tight to the ground and add stone mulch later to keep down weeds and discourage mice and other pests

    [​IMG]

    Two 5' posts and 40-48" wire lifted off the ground will protect most trees from bucks or browsing but some may need a taller heavier setup.

    [​IMG]

    1st year trees

    [​IMG]

    2nd year trees

    [​IMG]

    3rd year trees

    [​IMG]

    Painting

    This video explains apple training very well

    UMass Fruit Advisor: apple training techniques

    Central leader development:

    [​IMG]

    Pinching apple trees for leader development

    Articles on how and when to prune apple trees:

    Pruning Apple Trees

    Pruning Apple trees

    Pruning and Training fruit trees

    Great pruning info.

    Training and Pruning Apple Trees

    All About Caring for Apple Trees

    Pruning & Training Apple & Pear Trees

    Ben on scoring the leader

    Videos on pruning

    Fruitwise guide to apple tree pruning-using the saw

    Fruitwise guide to pruning-the neglected apple tree

    Fruitwise pruning a neglected tree part 2

    Fruitwise guide to pruning apple trees-part 1

    Fruitwise guide to pruning apple trees part 2

    Fruitwise guide to apple tree pruning-sawing large branch

    Disease

    Many diseases spoil the apple for human consumption but perhaps not for wildlife, still I prefer to plant varieties that are disease resistant.

    Disease-Resistant Apple Cultivars

    This link includes more info on diseases of apple trees:

    Apple & Crabapple Diseases

    Fruit Disease links

    Cedar Apple Rust is pretty hard to avoid here in Iowa so I try to select for trees that carry some resistance to this problem.

    Spectracide Immunox Multi-Purpose Fungicide

    Spectracide Immunox Plus Insect & Disease Control

    Cedar-Apple Rust

    apple cultivar susceptibility to the cedar-apple rust fungus

    Cedar-Apple Rust and Related Rust Diseases

    CEDAR-APPLE RUST

    Fire Blight

    Controlling Fire Blight


    Insecticides and Fungicides

    You can sign up for Apple Pest Reports via email through this link or just open them here:

    2009 Apple Pest Report

    This link contains a number of questions and answers regarding dealing with apple tree pests.
    Questions on: Apple Insects

    SIMPLIFIED HOME ORCHARD SPRAY SCHEDULE

    2009 Midwest Tree Fruit Spray Guide

    Protecting Backyard Apple Trees from Apple Maggot

    Apple and Pear Insects

    ISU Apple Insect Control Field Trials

    QDMA Apple Spraying Discussion

    Orchard Supplies

    Woolly Apple Aphid


    SpringStar Apple Maggot Traps


    This is a comprehensive list of fruit tree insecticides:

    Insecticides - A-Z

    Controlling Diseases and Insects in Home Fruit Plantings

    Fruit Tree answers

    Ways to Reduce Pesticide Use

    Tree Fruit Production with Organic Farming Methods

    Organic fruit tree care

    Organic Fruit Tree Sprays



    Budding and Grafting

    Budding and Grafting

    Grafting pictures

    Dbltree's Apple/Pear list:


    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2011
  4. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

    Messages:
    9,446
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    SE Iowa

    This past summer was pretty hectic (to put it mildly...;))so I didn't keep up on questions such as these. Only one problem with my wife's recovery is that she went to work on my file cabinet "mess" and now I can't find anything not that I could actually find it before ....

    I requested a copy of the trees I ordered but it remains to be seen if they actually send me a copy of my order. Adams County Nursery

    This is a list of ACN apple stock for an example...you can order these from other suppliers:



    What I look for is ripening dates that will coincide with hunting dates and then look for disease resistant varieties in that time frame.

    You can see that combining dates and disease resistance considerably shortens the list...





    It also doesn't hurt to think about Pollinators if needed:

    Bloom: Early Season

    Available Rootstock(s)
    EMLA 26
    EMLA 7
    EMLA 111


    Pollination Information
    Chestnut crab is an early blooming variety and can pollinate all other early blooming apple varieties as well as varieties with mid-season bloom times.


    Hyslop
    A mid-season blooming crab apple that provides large red fruit 1 to 1-1/2 inch in diameter. Often used for jams and jellies because of its large size, and sometimes added to cider where tannin content is desired. Care must be taken to avoid biennial bearing, which reduces effectiveness as a pollen source. Tree is medium in vigor, precocious, with moderate resistance to fire blight.
    Bloom: Mid Season

    Available Rootstock(s)
    BUD 9
    EMLA 26
    EMLA 7


    Pollination Information
    Hysolp blooms in mid-season and will pollinate early blooming apple varieties and varieties blooming in the middle of the season.


    Indian Summer
    A flowering crab apple pollinizer for the early season bloom. Indian Summer produces abundant pink flowers with viable pollen over an extended period.
    Bloom: Late Season

    Available Rootstock(s)
    EMLA 7


    Pollination Information
    Indian Summer blooms early in the season and will pollinate all other early blooming varieties.


    Manchurian
    Early to mid-season bloom corresponding with Red Delicious. Flowers white and large. Tree is very vigorous and upright.
    Bloom: Mid Season

    Available Rootstock(s)
    BUD 9


    Pollination Information
    Manchurian crab blooms in early season and will pollinate early blooming apple varieties and varieties blooming in the middle of the season.


    Snowdrift
    A mid-season to late blooming variety, often used to pollinize Red Delicious. Bloom is white, flowers small. Fruits are salmon egg sized, yellow with orange cheek. Snowdrift is used to pollinate mid-season apple varieties.
    Bloom: Mid Season

    Available Rootstock(s)
    EMLA 26


    Spur Winter Banana
    Excellent pollinizer for Red Delicious. Spur-type growth makes tree compact with little maintenance required. Tree begins bearing at an early age. Annual defruiting of tree will optimize return bloom.
    Bloom: Mid Season





    Think about rootstock that matches your soil and tree type: Apple Rootstocks

    Just a couple that will work in my heavy clay ground:

    Quote:
    EMLA 106

    Somewhat larger than EMLA 7, the EMLA 106 is better anchored. Resistant to woolly aphids, it seldom rootsuckers, and performs best on dry sites. It is extremely susceptible to collar rot and should not be planted in wet sites or heavy clay soils.
    EMLA 111

    A vigorous semi-dwarf, EMLA 111 produces a tree somewhat larger than EMLA 106. Trees are well anchored, resistant to collar rot and woolly aphids. A good selection for heavy, poorly-drained soils.



    It's that time of year when we start planning for spring plantings (assuming all your tags are filled... :)) and there are plenty of great nurseries to "shop" for apple and pear trees:

    Adams County Nursery

    Boyer Nurseries

    Stark Nursery

    Miller Nusery

    Vintage Virginia Apples

    Morse Nursery

    Red Fern Farm

    Raintree Nursery - Asian Pears

    Burnt Ridge Nursery - Apples and Pears

    Woodstock Nursery

    St. Lawrence Nurseries

    Cummins Nursery

    Oikos Tree crops

    If your not confused by all of that...there are at least a "bazillion" varieties to decide from...

    All About Apples - Varieties

    Apple Cultivars

    Apples and More

    Pruning Apple Trees

    Pruning and Training

    More pruning

    Spring Cold Impact on Apple Crops

    Full size Apple trees vs Dwarf Apple trees

    Apple Rootstocks and Spacings

    That should keep you busy while I try to figure just what the heck I planted... :)
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2010
  5. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

    Messages:
    9,446
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    SE Iowa
    Re: Apple/Pear Trees - Planting, Pruning and Spray

    Previously in this thread we have shared plenty of places to order apple and pear trees but I thought I would add more info on preparing your site for planting.

    The following link covers most of what you'll need to prepare for your new apple trees.
    Growing Apple Trees In The Home Garden

    Apple tree growing Information

    Care of the Mature Backyard Apple Tree

    Adams County Nursery - Fruit Tree Planting Guide

    There are a number of links on pruning also a few posts back in this thread but this is a good link on the subject:

    Pruning & Training Apple & Pear Trees

    Many diseases spoil the apple for human consumption but perhaps not for wildlife, still I prefer to plant varieties that are disease resistant.

    This link includes more info on diseases of apple trees:

    Apple & Crabapple Diseases

    Cedar/Apple rust is pretty hard to avoid here in Iowa so I try to select for trees that carry some resistance to this problem.

    Randy located this link on Cedar-Apple Rust but more important it includes a link to disease resistant varieties.

    apple cultivar susceptibility to the cedar-apple rust fungus

    There are so many disease resistant varieties to choose from such as this list from Adams County Nursery






    Liberty apples are on that is also very disease resistant but the key is to find disease resistant apple trees that will ripen in late fall. Which narrows the field a bit.

    Several of us have been discussing pooling a spring order at Adams Co. Nursery because there is a significant price drop once you order 25 trees and even more at 100 trees.

    It's something to think about before you place an order for apple trees. Perhaps this thread would be a good place to mention if your interested in combining an order.

    ACN Price Sheet

    Rather then pay $25-30 a tree combining an order can drop the price to $10-14 a tree.
    ACN also has pear trees and remember Asian pears tend to mature much later in the fall and are also more disease resistant.



    ACN Pear Tree Varieties

    The Adams Co. folks have been excellent to deal with and a great many on the QDMA site have been very satisfied with ACN service and products.

    This link is a month by month guide to caring for and preparing for your fruit trees as well.

    Fruit Tree Growing Tips

    Of course you can fall plant bare root trees once trees become dormant most likely in November and again as soon as they can be shipped and planted in the spring.

    Balled or potted trees can be planted anytime and fall is also a great time to plant and often there are sales at places like Earl May and Menards.

    Insecticides and Fungicides
    This link contains a number of questions and answers regarding dealing with apple tree pests.
    Questions on: Apple Insects

    Quote:
    Q: For many years, we have had an abundance of apples with worms in them. This makes the apples inedible. What should we be doing to get rid of the worms? (Mooreton, N.D.)

    A: Spray using an insecticide, such as Sevin, at blossom drop and again in 10 to 14 days. Spraying two more times after that should do the trick. You can try pheromone traps, if you can locate them. Put two or three traps in the larger trees. Picking up the apples that drop to the ground in the fall goes a long way in breaking the infestation cycle.


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Q: I know this might sound stupid but when you say "mock apples" do you mean just any old fake apple or is there something called mock apples that are made for this purpose? I can't imagine why a maggot would get stuck on a plastic apple! (McClusky, N.D.)

    A: They do sell apples, plastic or otherwise, that are covered with a tangle-foot type of material. The apples may contain pheromone that attracts the female adult insect. The insects die of dehydration after being trapped. You can also get the sex pheromone traps that attract the males into thinking there is a female within. It’s nasty to the insect but it works and is better than spraying a lot of indiscriminate insecticides.




    Protecting Backyard Apple Trees from Apple Maggot

    Apple and Pear Insects

    ISU Apple Insect Control Field Trials

    Woolly Apple Aphid

    Quote:
    Insecticides used to control woolly apple aphid in commercial orchards are dimethoate (Cygon), endosulfan (Thiodan), chlorpyriphos (Lorsban), or methyl parathion (Penncap-M). Home gardeners can use diazinon or insecticidal soap.

    Woolly apple aphid infestations on rootstocks cannot be controlled by insecticides






    SpringStar Apple Maggot Traps

    This is a comprehensive list of fruit tree insecticides:

    Insecticides - A-Z

    Controlling Diseases and Insects in Home Fruit Plantings

    Fruit Tree answers


    Ways to Reduce Pesticide Use

    Tree Fruit Production with Organic Farming Methods

    Organic fruit tree care

    Organic Fruit Tree Sprays

    Root Feed for fruit Trees

    Fertilizing Fruit Trees

    Fertilizing Tree Fruits

    Fertilizing Apple Trees

    Fertilizer Stakes

    Assorted Fertilizers
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2010
  6. letemgrow

    letemgrow PMA Member

    Messages:
    2,629
    Likes Received:
    63
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Olathe, KS/Hunt Mercer, MO
    Here are some pics of what I do at the base of apple trees to keep the girdlers at bay.
    I used tree pro's, cut them down in 1/2 after I took them off other trees that had grown out of the tubes.


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  7. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

    Messages:
    9,446
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    SE Iowa
    Geeish..at least I got one right..

    Here are some grafting videos:

    Grafting Fruit Trees

    Fruitwise apple tree grafting, the saddle graft

    Saddle graft apple tree-5 months after

    Down To Earth - Grafting Fruit Trees

    Freedom Tree Farms - Budding and Grafting

    Fruit tree grafting, budding and more - Benji Woodman-pt1

    Fruit tree grafting, budding and more - Benji Woodman-pt2

    Fruit tree grafting, budding and more - Benji Woodman-pt3

    I haven't watched all of them yet...so hopefully they are actually about "grafting"...
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2010
  8. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

    Messages:
    9,446
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    SE Iowa
    yes...I forgot to mention that...

    I suspect the farther south the worse the problems but I can't say for sure. There are many opinions on all of this "apple" stuff and I am by no means an expert...

     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2009
  9. letemgrow

    letemgrow PMA Member

    Messages:
    2,629
    Likes Received:
    63
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Olathe, KS/Hunt Mercer, MO
    I am going to make sure and keep a 4 foot cirlce killed around the apple trees and use a low screen/tree tube at the base of the apple trees with poison in them for anything that dares to enter. I can tell so far that the lower the tube to the ground the less rodents will use it. I only had one casualty this past winter, to an american chestnut (the best one). I used the tallest tube on it about 2 feet tall while the rest were not touched on 12-18" tubes.

    The screen would be the easiest by far though!!!
     
  10. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

    Messages:
    9,446
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    SE Iowa
    Douds Lumber...

    They have everything including the kitchen sink!

    I suspect Menards might have it cheaper but I'd have to burn 30 bucks worth of fuel to get there and back...

    Keeping all the grass/growth away from any tree goes a long way in solving rodent predation problems that's for sure...

    2009 Midwest Tree Fruit Spray Guide
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2009
  11. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

    Messages:
    9,446
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    SE Iowa
    My apple and pear trees will be arriving in the next week or two so I took advantage of the very wet soil conditions to get the holes "pre-dug"...;)

    [​IMG]

    Ok...so I took advantage of the cheap help too...

    [​IMG]

    I have a pile of black dirt I have hauled in and continually add compost too that I will use for fill when the trees arrive. I like to add peat moss and stir it in with my rear tine tiller to make a nice nutrient rich mix that has good moisture retention.

    [​IMG]

    I added pell lime to the soil around the holes and will stir some into top soil "cocktail" as well.

    Looking forward to getting them in the ground soon!
     
  12. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

    Messages:
    9,446
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    SE Iowa
    I wanted to amend my clay soil and give my new apple and pear trees a better chance at flourising rather then just surviving so I bought some sphagnum peat moss and tops soil and added it to the black clay loam I had hauled into my compost pile and "stirred it all up good"! :D
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Made a nice light loamy, moisture retaining mix to fill in the holes with!
    [​IMG]
    My Century Farm Orchard trees arrived in early April while I was at work so my son heeled them in and erected a fence around them to keep the rabbits out (did I mention I love my son... ;) )
    [​IMG]
     
  13. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

    Messages:
    9,446
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    SE Iowa
    Shortly therafter we commenced to planting, making sure to keep the graft union above the soil surface

    [​IMG]

    The "whips" don't look like much right now and I need to "work" on them a bit and will share pics later...

    [​IMG]

    We slipped on the window screen on, stapled it closed and watered each tree.

    [​IMG]

    and I also stapled the name tags to the screen for now

    [​IMG]
     
  14. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

    Messages:
    9,446
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    SE Iowa
    Looked something like this when we got done
    [​IMG]
    We added 10 apple trees and 2 pear trees to our collection and three more asian pears have yet to arrive. These trees are in my yard but keep in mind that every deer traveling across our farm does so within "yards" of our yard...so why drag the trees to the back 40? ;)
     
  15. Sligh1

    Sligh1 Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    6,231
    Likes Received:
    1,826
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Central, IA
    What you all prefer for mulching? Do you get a load of bark?
    *I had done one method that was NOT recommended but had great success- old hay bales- I layered the areas around tree (killed with round-up) with hay and it ended up laying flat as a pancake later. NOT recommended because of mice and rabbits and all that finding homes BUT in this instance, I was in a hurry and thought I'd try it (a few years ago).
    I'll FOR SURE be doing that screen stappling, maybe if I do that I could do the free hay again since I am doing the screens BUT what's your thoughts and advice on how you approach any kind of mulching??

    **Also, I sprayed some Oust on some trees a couple years ago, the forester friend had mixed it and it may have been too strong and I made the mistake of spraying around fresh planted apple trees- DEAD as can be in about a month (yes, that is what did it, not a disease or other chemicals in sprayer- been through it all). Just in case, just to be safe, don't make my mistake- just use round-up and mulch those babies!
     
  16. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

    Messages:
    9,446
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    SE Iowa
    The safest mulch is crushed limestone or almost any kind of small stone such as the decorative stone you buy in bags at Wally Mart. Limestone of course is cheaper but this elminates the mice and such burrowing under the mulch.

    Certainly any kind of typical wood mulch or old hay will hold down weeds and conserve moisture but be careful not to let it get to close to the tree trunk as it also is a great place for all kinds of bugs that like both mulch and apple trees...;)

    I like to use a combination of limestone around the trunk and I kind of bury the window screen into it and then wood mulch a foot or so away in as big a radius as one wants.

    Oust is potent stuff!! I think it might be fine at low doses around estabilished trees but mulch is the safest or a herbicide like Surflan which is a very safe residual. Thanks for the warning about the Oust Skip...:)
     
  17. letemgrow

    letemgrow PMA Member

    Messages:
    2,629
    Likes Received:
    63
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Olathe, KS/Hunt Mercer, MO
    looking good Paul!!!! A couple of the century farm apple trees that I planted last fall already had blooms on them!!! The Hughes had over 20 so I plucked them off so the tree puts on more growth instead of apples this young.
     
  18. Sligh1

    Sligh1 Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    6,231
    Likes Received:
    1,826
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Central, IA
    Where do you buy the stone at a cost effective price?
    *I have about 140 apple and pear trees. Thanks!!!
     
  19. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

    Messages:
    9,446
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    SE Iowa
    Douds Stone...I usually use the 3/4 stone but I reckon it doesn't matter 1" on down.

    You can take a pickup or trailer down or have a load hauled in.

    Call Perry Louth RPS trucking 319-498-4224

    or

    Douds Stone 641-936-4331 ...most likely talk to Vicki Smith and just ask which quarry to go to.

    They have pea rock at the sand quarry at Eldon for instance and limestone in all sizes at the other quarrys. You just pull on the scale and weigh you truck/trailer, go load up and then re-weigh and pay.


    or call Perry and he'll send you a bill...;)
     
  20. Sligh1

    Sligh1 Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    6,231
    Likes Received:
    1,826
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Central, IA
    Any of you ever try those black roll out matting that is used like a mulch- sometimes folks mulch over the black mats.

    I have a few apple trees it's going to be really far and hard to get stone, etc back there. What's your opinion/experiences of only putting down the black matting and staking it down- mine would be BEHIND a giant 8' fence so nothing could mess the mats up. What do you think of the mats, staking them down and using those only in this instance??
     
  21. letemgrow

    letemgrow PMA Member

    Messages:
    2,629
    Likes Received:
    63
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Olathe, KS/Hunt Mercer, MO
    Skip,

    I would think the black matting may encourage rodents to hang out there personally. In that situation I would just spray with roundup and keep the area open.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice