Edge Feathering and bedding areas

Discussion in 'Dbltree's corner' started by dbltree, Jul 26, 2006.

  1. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Osage Orange a.k.a. hedge trees are a pain and difficult to cut because they twisted together making girdling also difficult. They can be killed via girdle and herbicides such as Tordon, Crossbow and Remedy applied to the cut area.

    Keep in mind the trees will be there for eternity and will be hard as iron, but new growth can flourish once trees are killed...
     
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  3. Scott

    Scott Active Member

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    My two year old hinged timber has had an explosion of stick tights in it and it drives me nuts walking thru them. Do you think as the growth matures the stick tights will phase out? The multi flora is coming in pretty quick to, the deer still go in it but its miserable to walk in. I am hoping the brushy growth takes over.
     
  4. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    It will slowly transition to brush but remember...miserable to walk thru is exactly what deer want, they are impervious to thorns...

    If it's easy to walk thru...it's not thick enough ;)
     
  5. MN Hunter

    MN Hunter Active Member

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    Scott, I have the same problem with stick tights. Where ever I have done tsi they are there. I have come across multi floral rose and buckthorn as well. I try to kill them both, they are exotics and choke out everything else and I can not stand them. They might be great habitat for deer but I'd rather have gooseberries and raspberries growing instead. Just my 2 cents
     
  6. letemgrow

    letemgrow PMA Member

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    One of the best deer foods out there are the tick trefoils. Always makes me happy when I walk out from the farm and have a bunch of those seeds on my clothes...I know there were some happy deer and not counting the benefits of them for pollinators and birds.
     
  7. BarnacleBob

    BarnacleBob Gobbler Gitter

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    First, this is a great thread, thanks to all the participants and your vast knowledge on this sibject... :)

    Our land is in middle Tenn. and consists of a stand of 50 yr old mostly hardwoods, red & white oak... this stand has been clear cut twice. I cleared about a 1/2 acre spot & planted assorted clovers and chicory.... along with a hinge cutting plan that has thus far exceeded all expectations, the deer immediately began bedding in the cuts....

    My question concerns leaf matter on the forrest floor surrounding the hinge cuts.... will forbes, blackberries, and vines naturally take root when this leaf matter is present or should it be raked to expose the soil? Will dispersing pelletized lime in these areas enhance the break down of the leaf matter to expose the soil?

    What is the best practice for leaf matter management besides prescribed burning??? TIA
     
  8. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Usually once canopy is reduced and sunlight allowed in, forbs will take off in an explosion of new growth but certainly lime and fertilizer would enhance growth.

    Be careful burning hinged areas better to burn before tops are on the ground.
     
  9. BarnacleBob

    BarnacleBob Gobbler Gitter

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    @Dbltree.... thanks for the quick response and the great pics throughout these threads...

    Is there any truth that dispersing lime followed immediately by fertilizer that the lime will cancel out certain chemical actions of the fertilizer? I was informed to lime first, then wait 4 - 6 weeks before spreading fertilizer.

    When fertilizing the hinged areas, what type fertilizer would you recommend?

    TIA
     
  10. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    I would just broadcast together and use a low N fertilizer
     
  11. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Tim sent in a few pictures of his timber project .......

    Very open timber with zero bedding cover

    [​IMG]

    Before

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    After

    [​IMG]

    Best to hinge when temps are near or above freezing and remember to be safe out there.
     
  12. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    February 24th, 2014

    Jesse and his crew have been busy doing a REAP funded crop tree release/weed tree removal using hinging as the primary means of releasing crop trees. REAP is a cost program peculiar to Iowa that allows us to do TSI and tree planting at little or no cost to the landowner.

    [​IMG]

    Some species such as shingle and red oak, cherry and locust are likely to break off, while elm, hackberry, hickory and others hinge well. Those that break off will send up an explosion of stump shoots creating a plethora of new browse and cover

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    Whitetails will usually bed in openings behind downed tops

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    The second trees hit the ground new bedding is created

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    There is as they say, more then one way to skin a cat and so it is with improving timber and cover and most will do trick. Share your own version of timber improvement and cover enhancement to give others helpful ideas :way:
     
  13. MN Hunter

    MN Hunter Active Member

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    My dad bought this farm 9 years ago, most of the 'timber' is old overgrown pasture full of boxelders and elms that are around 20-25 years old. For the past 7 years I have done TSI in the winter and early spring. I have 3 areas of the farm that I work on each year, so each part of the farm has different stages of regeneration. Most of the tsi ground is then planted with trees in the spring.

    In the first picture, the left portion shows what the area looked like before cutting, the right side shows after cutting.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    The second picture shows 'blocks' I have created to funnel deer around my stand so they cannot get down wind on a NW wind.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    In the third picture in the background you can see the tree tubes housing the trees that were planted last spring, tall grass, gooseberry, and raspberry usually explode after the canopy is opened up.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  14. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Nice work thanks for posting
     
  15. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Predator control

    My son loves trapping, great hobby as is predator calling but many people falsely believe they can increase fawn recruitment via trapping and hunting

    [​IMG]

    Predators respond however by having larger, healthier litters, so the answer is providing exceptional cover

    [​IMG]

    In the timber this can be done quickly using hinge cutting, timber stand improvement and in some cases logging and clear cutting

    [​IMG]

    Creating thick cover not only allows does to hide fawns better but dramatically increases the number of prey species. In open timber mice and rabbits are almost nonexistent

    [​IMG]

    But they abound in thick, brushy environments, providing a plentiful food source for predators

    [​IMG]

    Fawn recruitment rises greatly when you get out the chainsaw but by all means enjoy trapping and hunting predators as well ;)
     
  16. goatman

    goatman I hunt days ending in Y

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    Great post Paul.
     
  17. 4 Buck

    4 Buck Active Member

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    Pretty good sized kitty Jesse! Thanks for sharing with us Paul
     
  18. Jbohn

    Jbohn Active Member

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    Well I contacted Jesse a few months ago to come to my Illinois farm and help create some bedding areas, review my timber and help me create a plan ! This week end we created 2 really good bedding areas and helped release my better oak trees to produce more acorns as well.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I learned more in 2 days about my timber than I would have the next 10 years, how to funnel, hinge , release oak's, create brows. One thing Jesse told me that really hit home to me was If you don't have rabbit's on your farm you don't have deer and I don't see no Rabbits !:D After all the brush and mess we created I think I'll have plenty of Rabbits and deer too !!! Excited for this up coming season. Had several neighbors stop by some while Jesse was there and some after wanted to know what I was up to. I think chain saw sales are going to go up in my area..
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2014
  19. Daver

    Daver PMA Member

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    I cannot recall ever reading or hearing that before, but I think that is very sound advice. When I bought my farm in SE Iowa 12-13 years ago there were NO rabbits, which surprised me. Now, several years later, AND we now have a bobcat population that doesn't mind a rabbit meal now and then, we have quite a few rabbits.

    They are really a byproduct though of all of the habitat work we have done there over the years. That is a good rule of thumb to keep in mind.
     
  20. southcentral

    southcentral Member

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    How do I contact Jesse
     
  21. Daver

    Daver PMA Member

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    Dbltree Habitat Enhancement - Paul & Jesse Knox, Birmingham, Iowa
    dbltree2000@yahoo.com
    jknox0623@gmail.com

    The second email is Jesse's. I have his phone # too, but without asking him I would prefer not to post it. But he will reply to emails promptly.
     

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