Milo

Discussion in 'Dbltree's corner' started by BOWSTRING, Dec 12, 2008.

  1. BOWSTRING

    BOWSTRING New Member

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    Anyone planted this before. I'm looking for something easy to manage to replace the multi flora rose that I'm going to kill this spring? How tall does it get? Is it fairly easy to grow?
    This will be in a bottom clearing in a small timber. (15acres)The plot will be about an acre unless I run out of gas cleaning it up.
    Looking for something for cover and bedding and if they eat it it'll be a bonus.
     
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  3. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Milo is grain sorghum and doesn't get real tall. It's been awhile since I stood in a field of milo but I'm thinking roughly 4 feet high.

    [​IMG]

    It's pretty sturdy and will stand up well but it may not be the ultimate screen. Forage sorghum or Egyptian Wheat can grow 8-10 feet tall and froms a great screen.

    High winds and snow can flatten it this time of year but pictures just posted of EW showed it still standing fairly well.

    Pheasants Forever has some great sorghum mixes so you might want to check with them as they have both short and tall versions (or did anyway)

    PF Sorghum mixes

    Growing milo

    When planting soybeans and peas with milo Dual Magmum II provides excellent weed control for both. You must ask for "safened" sorghum seed however or buy safner and treat the seed yourself.

    Dual MagnumII Herbicide label

    Concep Seed Safner

    Welter Seed-Sorghum and milo seed

    Milo/soybean seed mix Keep in mind the planting rate is for haylage so one might need to cut it back slightly...;)

    More about growing sorghum

    Both Pheasants Forever and the National Wild Turkey Federation offer free or low cost sorghum amd milo seed and sometimes soybean seed so join both, support them and then take home some free seed! :)

    Some key planting info from the above link...

     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2010
  4. Joey Rott

    Joey Rott New Member

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    We have a lot of milo fields around here, and i'd have to say it's my favorite crop to deer hunt on. When it's mature and still green, the bucks love to bed it in. The bucks were like clockwork in it this past September. About 30 minutes before dark, they'd stand up (usually 2-8 bucks) and start feeding. I hunted the 80 acre milo in September 9-10 times and the bucks were bedded in it every time. Once the milo started to dry and loose the green they stopped bedding in it, but continued to visit it daily.

    When the snow gets deep, the milo is still there as a food source. Last December we got a descent amount of snow and a nasty icestorm, and the milo field had deer in it every day as the stalks were standing above the snow. The nearby soybean & wheat fields, didn't get 1/10 the traffic.

    Just something to ponder. It's a real productive crop in the upland areas around here.

    The biggest downsides are that I doubt it has as much nutritional benefits as other crops, and once it's mature it's very tough to shoot in. We had a big buck within 50 yards on a couple of occasions in September. But all we could see what the head of the deer, as the rest of the body was covered up by the Milo. And even with the ML, my wife didn't risk the shot.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 30, 2010
  5. SEIowaDeerslayer

    SEIowaDeerslayer Active Member

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    I planted an acre of it this year and the deer do love to bed in it. I haven't seen sign of them eating it...yet, but I imagine in January when the feed starts to get scarce they won't be too picky.

    It did bring in a group of 5-10 pheasants, not enough to hunt, but its fun to see them occasionally when bowhunting.

    The turkeys love it as well. This fall I saw more turkeys on our property than ever before.
     
  6. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Some people have great luck with milo but for a food source attractive if there are not more desirable sources near by.

    Corn and alfalfa generally trump milo, but if no other crops are near by or are gone in the late season they will hit it hard.

    Very useful addition to one's habitat managment program! ;)
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2010
  7. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    This link will give you most of the info you need to know: Grain Sorghum (Milo)

    It's not that much difference then corn so Atrazine will work as a herbicide and Dual Magnum II if the seed has been treated with a "safener".

    Loves nitrogen an hates weeds but can be either row planted or broadcast. It's a little more drought resistant then corn and should be planted a little later then corn when soil temps warm up a bit.

    I think some or all of the PF mixes are safened but I would check be fore using Dual. Stir in a 100#'s of actual N at planting and stand back! :)
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2010
  8. Bighole

    Bighole Member

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    We've had alot of succes with ther PF mix of grain sorghum & forage sorghum. The forage sorghum gets 8-10 ft tall, it is subject to being blown over by the wind at times, but the shorter grain sorghum will hold it up off the ground.

    The deer love it on our area, but we do not have much corn nearby for competition. We have also planted climbing peas with the sorghum and have had good results with that as well.


    We have tried a couple of different things, but have found that spraying atrazine as a pre-emergent works best for us. I don't really like working with atrazine, but it seems to be the most effective for weed control.

    We tried spraying round-up as a pre-emergent, hoping that the sorghum & beans would get tall enough to out compete the weeds. That process did not work very well. I suppose it could have been a combination of the cooler, wetter weather that effected the growth of what we planted, but it did'nt take long for the weeds to catch up.

    The climbing beans that we have been planting can only ne sprayed with a pre-emergent, at least as far as I know. So that restricts what you can use.
     
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  9. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Select is a grass herbicde that will kill milo and corn

    2-4DB is labled for soybeans but read the lable! Butyrac 200

    It is not as effective as 2-4D so control may be limited.
    Postemergence Broadleaf Herbicides for Soybeans

    Dual Magnum II is a pre-emergence herbicide that is very effective if you use safened sorghum seed.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2010
  10. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Re: Milo and soybeans



    I'm guessing in your area that late May would be fine to plant a mix of soybeans and milo.

    Welters Soybean Milo Mix is planted at 150#'s per acre while milo alone is roughly 10-15#'s per acre.

    That should give you some idea if you mix your own.

    Milo loves nitrogen so urea tilled in just before planting would sure feed both even though the beans don't need it, they'll be happy to use it!

    Anywhere from 200-300#'s of 46% urea will make for some awesome sorghum growth but 40-80#'s of P&K per acre might be needed as well.

    I would soil test for corn and you'll be covered in that respect.

    Eagle Forage Seed has some awesome vining/climbing soybeans if you can locate some in your area.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2010
  11. turkeyriver

    turkeyriver PMA Member

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    Re: Milo and soybeans

    I planted some pheasant milo plots this year with my no-till GP drill. We worked the ground smooth in late May, then waited a week till a big flush of weeds came. Sprayed this flush with a little R'up, after it dryed I drilled the milo in.Didn't spray again and had excellent weed control. I divided my drill into 3 sections. one had straight grain milo, one forage sorghum, and the other about 75%grain milo and 25% forage sorghum. Late season hunting the forage sorghum had fallen over on top of the short stuff and made excellent pheasant cover and feed. We shot two birds out of it in Jan. and their crops were absolutely stuffed with milo, even tho there were corn fields next door.

    Not sure. I believe the drill was set for 30# but we used some old seed mixed in so I don't know what the final pop. was.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 27, 2010
  12. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Re: Milo and soybeans


    The Welters mix is heavy on soybeans while the PF mixes I know of are pure milo/sorghum mixes of varying degrees and they are meant to serve different puposes in different situations.

    The Welter mix is meant for making silage or hay and not for grazing although in most cases deer would thin the soybeans anyway.

    Planting a plot for heavy deer grazing is not the same as planting a plot for birds... ;)

    I haven't mixed in millet and I suspect that the milo/sorghum would be to tall and dominant unless one mixed it very light on milo.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2010
  13. turkeyriver

    turkeyriver PMA Member

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    Re: Milo and soybeans


    Millet is in some of the PF mixes and it will grow in the mix. If I'm not mistaken, it looks somewhat like giant foxtail? It makes a very small seed and I'm not sure about it's contribution to the total lbs. of feed per acre. If you use Dual for weed control I would think it would hurt millet, but I'm not sure.
     
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  14. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    There are several types of millet that are great for birds but not so sure about deer?

    Several pics and varieties listed here: Millet Varieties

    Dual controls foxtail so I'm with turkeyriver...I think it would nuke the millet...

    I'll be planting some sorghum here in the next few weeks, plenty early yet as sorghum generally is planted more in line with soybeans then corn. Perhaps it is not as frost tolerant as corn or just prefers warmer soils but in any event don't be in a rush to plant it to early in the spring.

    Planting rates vary but 20-30# per acre is roughly a reccomend rate, sowing sorghum to thick will cause it to compete against itself for available nutrients and soil moisture and to thin will allow weeds to invade.

    If broadcasting, lightly drag or cultipack the seed to cover or plant with a grain drill.

    Like corn or any grass, sorghum loves itrogen and hates weeds!

    On most soils it could thrive with just nitrogen but soil testing would ensure that P&k levels are up to snuff. I work with wahtever is available in my area and in my case triple 13 applied at 200#'s per acre gives me 26#'s per acre of N-P-K and then 100#'s of 46-0-0 urea puts me up over 70#'s total actual nitrogen per acre.

    If nothing else, feed sorghum plenty of N by tilling in 150#'s of urea just before planting and it will do very well for you!

    The nitrogen of course will encourage a flush of weeds but atrazine applied at planting will solve that problem. I spray right after planting at 2-3 quarts per acre of atrazine or if no-tilling add 1-2 quarts of roundup.

    Atrazine presents a problem because it is a restricted use pesticide requiring a license to purchase, so this means plotters often need to hire it done or locate a friend with a RUP license.

    Atrazine 4L label

    Dual Magnum II herbicide provides and answer as it is not restricted, however it is expensive at nearly $300 for a 2 1/2 gallon jug. Sorghum seed needs to be "safened" with Concep to be allow the use of Dual with out harming the sorghum but most seed from Pheasants Forever is treated and safe to plant with Dual.

    Dual is commonly available at most farm elevators and is used on both corn and soybeans as well as sorghum.

    Be sure to follow the label instructions!

    Dual Magnum II label

    Cinch is a generic version of Dual that is a little less costly form of
    S-metolachlor

    Cinch herbicide label

    The nice thing about using S-metolachlor is that one can add soybeans to the sorghum mix and still control weeds. The sorghum will somewhat protect the soybeans while they are young and in doing so give you a better chance of a late fall/early winter food source along with some screening cover. :way:
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2010
  15. NovemberSunrise

    NovemberSunrise New Member

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    What is the mixture in Covey Rise? Perhaps there are more seeds per pound in it and spacing should not be dense? My second thought - PF seems to like annual weeds in plots (for example, they always seem to recommend leaving a plot alone the year after and just letting the weeds fill it in.). I imagine that they are having you plant it thin in the hopes of annuals filling in the gaps.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 30, 2010
  16. Long_Spur_Hollow

    Long_Spur_Hollow New Member

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    Milo and AWP's combo

    Hello guys,
    It has been a slow start on plots for me this spring, as my river bottom farm land is just starting to dry out. I have got about 1/3 of my summer plots done so far.

    I want try something a bit different...I am planting milo in a 6 acre field. I will be planting it at 30 inch rows and a target rate of about 10 lb/acre. I will use starter fertilizer as well. The Welter Seed Co web site says 25lb/acre - but that seems pretty strong based upon my experiences in the past, so I am going to shoot for the 10lb unless I hear from someone here that says "go to a higher rate". I will be using my JD 7100 4-row no-till planter for this task.

    I also have 150lbs of Austrian Winter Peas on hand. I thought that after planting the Milo, that I would drill the AWP at 20 to 30 lb/acre over the top of my Milo using my Great Plains NT drill at 7.5 inch spacing. The AWP's will be innoculated.

    Note that the soil is very rich and fertile. The soil has been tested for fertility and the ph is at 7.2 - this plot was underwater quite a bit this past year...with last summers flood, and unusually high spring river levels this year. It is almost like "free fertilizer" I guess.

    While I realize that a soybean and milo combo has been extensively discussed and is quite common...the AWP and milo combo has yet to be dealt with on this board (I believe). Does anyone see any problems with this combo and the rates? I appreciate the timely feedback, as I want to jump on this tomorrow before the rain that is forecast for the weekend.

    Thanks,
    Mike
     
  17. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    I would say you are in the ballpark regarding planting rates






    Soybeans also make a great addition to a milo planting but let us know how the milo/AWP combo works out...:)

    Grain Sorghum
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2009
  18. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    S-Metolachlor (Dual Magnum II or Cinch) provides awesome weed control and makes the milo/soybean marriage work very well!

    Here's a list of approved crops which does include peas:

    The label mentions that Dual can be applied pre-emergence on peas and of course milo if the seed has been safened:

    Dual MagnumII Label
     
  19. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Remember you can buy seed safener...check the front page for a source ;)

    We seem to be under a constant deluge of rain here in SE Iowa this year with another 3+" hitting us the other night, so I've given up on planting any milo this year, however...

    I came across this ISU test showing how field peas could be double cropped with soybeans or milo and was surprised that milo planted in early July did very well!

    Field Pea Rotation study

    In the study field peas were planted in very early spring, harvested in early July and then re-planted with either soybeans or milo.

    The soys did poor to fair but the milo yield 86 bushel per acre!

    Something to consider during wet years and for food plots mixing the milo and soybeans can be an awesome food plot! ;)
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2010
  20. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Usually the milo that Pheasants Forever offers is safened so you might check with your local chapter through your county conservation board.

    Dual Magnum II contains S-metalachlor while most generics do not (only metalachlor) which requires more per acre so just keep that in mind when comparing prices.

    Generic herbicides may not be bargain
     
  21. Skully

    Skully PMA Member

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    Just wanted to give a follow up on my milo/millet plot from last fall. I ordered the deer plot mix and an extra bag of milo from Welters last summer. The seed was great and my only problem was that I broadcast it and got it too thick. I didn't add any nitrogen and I don't think it was able to reach its full height. It did get about 4 feet tall in the best spots. That being said it is the ONLY thing left standing as thick cover for several sections. We had ice, wind, rain and snow and it stood up to everything Mother Nature threw at it and should become great nesting habitat for some turkeys and pheasants this spring. In my neck of the woods the deer barely touched it. The snow was very deep and the seed pods were exposed leading me to think that they would use it as a food source. I saw where they bedded in it but didn't browse it much. I am guessing the birds will utilize the remaining seeds this spring and summer so it will benefit some of the wildlife. My question now is what to do with it this fall? Do I burn it off? Mow it off? Then what could I put back in its place that may draw more attention from the deer? I am sure I will have to add nitrogen or something since my over-seeding probably leached out what little nutrients were in the ground to start with. Any ideas what to follow it up with would be appreciated! :way:
     

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