Miscanthus x Gianteus

Discussion in 'Dbltree's corner' started by OneCam, Mar 20, 2008.

  1. OneCam

    OneCam Administrator

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  3. muddy

    muddy Administrator

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    Good Lord... you could almost hang a stand on that stuff.
     
  4. OneCam

    OneCam Administrator

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    Here is a nice growth and standability sequence ...

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Fishbonker

    Fishbonker Life Member

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    Isn't that the same stuff Travis (Central Iowa) posted awhile back?

    You could hide a huge tribe of Fugarwees in that stuff.

    The 'Bonker
     
  6. JNRBRONC

    JNRBRONC PMA Member

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    Re: Miscanthus x Giganteus

    I think the following excerpt from the ISU pdf basically throws cold water on it.

    Establishment:
    • Miscanthus x giganteus produces no
    seed, so it must be established vegetatively
    by planting divided rhizome
    pieces. This process results in high
    establishment costs relative to crops
    established from seed.
    • The planting rate is one transplant
    per three square feet or about 4,000
    plants per acre.
    • As with other vegetatively
    propagated crops, dry soil moisture
    conditions at and following planting
    greatly decrease establishment
    success.
    A miscanthus stand, shown above center,
    takes three to five years to reach full production
    during which time the yield increases
    each successive year.
    • Establishment success may be
    limited by death of plants in the first
    winter after planting. European
    research suggests new plantings of
    Miscanthus x giganteus may not survive
    where soil temperatures fall below 26˚
    F at a depth of one inch, as they do in
    Iowa during the winter.
    • M. sinensis and M. sacchariflorus
    plantings have overwintered the first
    year in northern Europe where air
    temperatures have been as low as 0˚
    F. Winter survival is not a problem in
    the second and subsequent years.
     
  7. OneCam

    OneCam Administrator

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    It has been successfully grown in Illinois for years for biomass fuel research. I have been told to expect up to a 25% winter kill rate the first of planting. I agree it would be cost prohibitive if planting for cover but for screening it could be the ticket.

    I thought I would share a picture taken this weekend of our Miscanthus - this was planted around May 1st.

    [​IMG]

    This is one of the more impressive clumps in the bunch
     
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  8. Fishbonker

    Fishbonker Life Member

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    How does it stand up to a snow load? Won't provide much screen if it is flat after the first snow. I don't know if there has been any research on that aspect. Isn't most of it cut in the early fall for biomass?

    The 'Bonker
     
  9. JNRBRONC

    JNRBRONC PMA Member

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  10. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Answers to some questions in that link for sure. Interesting possibles if it can survive here.

    Anyone find out where to buy the stuff? We need to come up with a name that I can pronounce too...
     
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  11. Fishbonker

    Fishbonker Life Member

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    Good link. Sounds like it stands in winter.

    On a related note, I'm thinking of planitng a screen next to my neighbors fence. If it spreads to his side of the fence, and I'm sure it will, if he spays the fence line with weed/grass herbicide of some kind will the plants on my side of the fence die? My concern is the rhizomes connecting all the plants. I suppose if I think about clover and round up it only kills the clover it is directly sprayed on. But what about 24D or other herbacides? Will they flow through the rhizomes and kill the entire patch?

    The 'Bonker
     
  12. JNRBRONC

    JNRBRONC PMA Member

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    Southwest Sod Farm Item #30

    They are calling it an ornamental, so hang on to your wallet.
     
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  13. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    She's been "hanging" onto it for 30 years Randy...I don't think she's going to give it back either...



    I think I need Bonker to teach me how to be a real man

    Now I'm interested to see what the spacing is of this stuff and what type of soils it does best in.

    Bonker...roundup will kill anything that it contacts the leaves but 2-4D shouldn't affect it. Any grass herbicide that would be absorbed thru the roots would be a problem.
     
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  14. JNRBRONC

    JNRBRONC PMA Member

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    .




    Paul,
    See the ISU pdf (third link in Chris's post). On page one, third column, it talks of soil. This stuff grows best in "corn soils" and biomass yield is diminished in "poor and droughty soils". Granted I don't think we are looking for maximum biomass yield, but I'd guess the more tonnage it produces, the taller the stand is.

    I think I saw where they recommend planting on a three foot grid pattern.
     
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  15. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Sounds a lot like Eastern Gammagrass which, like corn really loves nitrogen for optimum growth.




    I did find this from a nursery in England however:


    Links:

    Miscanthus studies
    What is Miscanthus?
    Giant Miscanthus (Miscanthus x giganteus)
    Miscanthus x giganteus Miscanthus X Giganteus Propagation Studies Performance of 15 Miscanthus Genotypes More on Miscanthus

     
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  16. Central Iowa

    Central Iowa Administrator

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    They have planted 30 acres a day in Europe using potato planters! Think about that stand! The neat thing is you can satrt small and start splitting them to fill you screening needs with your initial investment. I think I may order a small amount and experiment for a year or two.

    Here are some pictures showing how the Miscanthus is doing so far. We planted the rhizomes on April 16 and we have an average of 6 inches of growth on most in one month. Here is the definition of a rhizome (they are a under ground stem: a thick underground horizontal stem that produces roots and has shoots that develop into new plants.) The first picture shows what they look like.
    [​IMG]
    I planted the rhizomes 3 foot apart and 2-3” deep. Hopefully this should form a nice wall that could be as tall as 12 foot and add a secure feeling to the plot as well as screening for access to and from stands.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Stay tuned for future updates. It appears now the biggest hurdle will be winter survival as the first winter is supposed to be the hardest.

    Most of my plants are in the 3 to 3 1/2 foot range, and few are over 5 foot. I didn't spray mine untill this past weekend with a mix of 24d and atrazine I will update again in 2-3 weeks.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    While at work today I found one of those hidden treasures that your around all the time and don't even know it's there. I have drove by this Miscanthus for all 5 years of it's existance walked by it probably half a dozen times but while on the phone today I picked up a brochure while standing in the lobby of Reiman Gardens in Ames and was reading about their biofuel tour of grasses, etc. and noticed they had Giant Miscanthus listed. So to truck for the camera I went then talked to one of the staff about it. They have never been split and are 5 years old. This stuff is thick and tall (well over 12 foot). If mine ends up even close to this in a few years I will be very happy. They had some that was older that looked great as well but not in the best spot for pictures. If you are driving past Reiman Gardens in Ames North of highway 30 next to Jack Trice stadium you can't miss it if you are looking for it.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
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  17. Skully

    Skully PMA Member

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    As a volunteer fire-fighter all I can think about what a hot sum-a-benchin' grass fire that stuff could produce! Holy blazes! I bet the critters would love it though!
     
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  18. bowhuntr311

    bowhuntr311 IowaWhitetail Addict

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    Skully,

    I never thought about the fire aspect till you mentioned it. That would be worse than lighting a good dry cat-tail slough (sp?) on fire.

    With it planted in rows as in the pictures. I bet that would really make some good cover. Broadcasted probably be so tough to get through that a deer would go around it than through it.

    Dean
     
  19. JNRBRONC

    JNRBRONC PMA Member

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    Being the victim of two arson fires when I had switch grass CRP, I think this is a very valid comment! If some low life is PO'd because he can't see through it from the road, all it takes is a match.

    I was thinking earlier that some type of shrub would be a much more cost effective screen. Even though it might lose it's leaves in fall/winter, branches should deflect bullets from road poachers.

    So I guess plant BOTH.
     
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  20. Critter

    Critter Life Member

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    I was thinking earlier that some type of shrub would be a much more cost effective screen. Even though it might lose it's leaves in fall/winter, branches should deflect bullets from road poachers.

    So I guess plant BOTH.



    Funny this topic popped up today.......I've thought about it numerous times when I'm thinking ahead about planning some cover seeding or a "road block" seeding. I wonder how often it happens. Probably wouldn't just be road poachers you'd have a problem with........cut off the visuals to your adjacent landowners and they might accidentaly flick their smoke at your bedding area. I doubt most would do it, but I'd be willing to bet it happens more than we know of.
     
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  21. JNRBRONC

    JNRBRONC PMA Member

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    Critr

    One grass fire was shortly after I busted two guys for trespassing, so I think it was retaliation.I recovered the Molotov cocktail "someone" threw into my field in an attempt to set the place on fire, but no finger prints were ever taken off of it. It had luckily landed in a bare area that they couldn't see from the road as they threw it. Thus, we were able to get the fire out and recover the device. CSI does not exist in rural Iowa! Don't expect "dusting for prints".

    The second fire happened while we were asleep. We looked out the window in the morning to see 4 charred acres. The local fire department had put it out or it would have been more. At that point, we decided that we needed a LARGE buffer between the CRP and the house.
     

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