Native Wildflowers and Plants

Discussion in 'Dbltree's corner' started by dbltree, Aug 9, 2009.

  1. letemgrow

    letemgrow PMA Member

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    Monarchs r stopping by on their way south. I'm sold on annual sunflowers for pollinators to go along with everything else.
     

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  3. letemgrow

    letemgrow PMA Member

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    Honey bees have the yard sounding like a jet engine...
     

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  4. IowaBowHunter1983

    IowaBowHunter1983 Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Cool stuff.... speaking of bees.... I was dealing with some milkweed issues a couple months ago and there were THOUSANDS of bees in that stuff once it flowered. Just an interesting observation.
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2016
  5. Sligh1

    Sligh1 Administrator Staff Member

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    What kind of sunflowers?
    I planted some Maximilian sunflowers this year. It's insane to see the vast varieties and amounts of sunflowers everywhere in iowa right now. im sure certain types are good and some could be problems in crops BUT I'm sure more and more interested in getting more varieties into my crp or other areas.
     
  6. letemgrow

    letemgrow PMA Member

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    Farmers worst nightmare...annual sunflower.
     
  7. letemgrow

    letemgrow PMA Member

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    They love the swamp milkweeds I have in the rain garden. More wasps visit it than I know how to ID, honey and bumble bees too.
     
  8. Sligh1

    Sligh1 Administrator Staff Member

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    Here's some forbs I love, here's one example..... These are Maximilian sunflowers. Most of these pics are the 1st year planted or some are mowed and flowerered back. Maximilians are EXTREMELY TALL. Unreal tall..... I've got some this year in some good quality soil, no joke, 10-12' tall. Downside on them, they can get a little thick so if you're concerned with choking other things out... You may want to dial the seed rate back a little. 1st picture is Maximilian 1st year with me holding a Big Blue Stem seed head that's also 1st year planting & seeded out. Maximilians are attractive to all sorts of critters and deer also eat the plant when younger (they bounce right back). Very drought tolerant in my experience. They reseed pretty prolifically & again, the potential to need to thin them out later is a possibility. I love them though.

    Some of my favorites for a VARIETY of reasons (cost will dictate a lot of this, look at the prices on some of these!!! WOW!! $$$!!! thankfully Maximilian and some of these are NOT too expensive)..... And, opposed to my stands of almost all natives.... I watched deer this fall feeding in my CRP which has natives as well as a diverse array of forbs in there, they were eating all sorts of things in there... Here's SOME of my favorites...

    Asters - several varieties you can get (expensive)
    Coneflowers - several varieties
    Some areas I do like doing Crimson clover (neat looking & good for wildlife)
    Prairie clovers - several varieties
    Milkweeds- several varieties
    IL Bundleflower
    Partridge Pea
    Blazing Star (fairly expensive)
    Daisy's
    Brown & black eyed susans
    Past that..... I'd read description on any Forb/flower out there to see if 1) it meets your goals & fits in the mix 2) in the budget 3) works in your soil types.


    BB in Summer with Maxmillian in background.jpg
    Maxmillian sunflowers summer 2.jpg Maxmillian sunflowers summer.jpg 2nd year Natives after mowing some w some maxmillian sunflowers.jpg Maxmillian Sunflower Fall.jpg
     
  9. EatSleepHunt

    EatSleepHunt Active Member

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    A quick question for you Skip. I have a field that used to be mostly switchgrass. Roughly 8 to 10 acres over the past five years there has been a transition to Goldenrod (an aster), a lot of it. Any down side to alot of goldenrod? Sure are plenty of pollinators, driving by a field Edge in the summer you could hear the pollinators buzzing over the ATV almost.
    Thanks in advance.
     
  10. Sligh1

    Sligh1 Administrator Staff Member

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    Personally, I'd get rid of Goldenrod. Especially if it's thick. If it's competing with switch to significant degree- for sure would. Does that ever happen? Very rarely. BUT.... IMO, I'd rather blast the GR and plant something else in it's place IF I wanted something beyond switchgrass. Too many other good options to plant VS goldenrod. 2,4-D OR burning
    OR.... 2,4-d + Post emergent + atrazine if you wanted just switch & able to spray before Switchgrass had emerged & growing.
    I like having Pollinator diversity. I'd do pollinators for sure, maybe in your planting, maybe elsewhere. But, I probably wouldn't want GR as a "choice".
     
  11. EatSleepHunt

    EatSleepHunt Active Member

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    How well does burning get rid of Goldenrod and the timing of the burn important?
    Thanks
     
  12. Sligh1

    Sligh1 Administrator Staff Member

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    Burning switch just before it sprouts out for the season will help. It will allow switch to explode and choke out other plants. It will also roast the cool seasons and forbs that are growing at the time. If you want to really hammer GR- herbicides may be needed but you could start with fire & look to herbicides later. There’s several ways to tackle this. If you want to interseed other pollinators to this-
    That obviously changes the dynamics here as well. Million ways to handle depending on what you want to be growing and have flourishing at the end of the day.
     
  13. LoessHillsArcher

    LoessHillsArcher Well-Known Member

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    Pretty stoked about our first year CRP planting. Drilled last year in mid November. Not much for big blue little blue or Indian grass yet but lots of tall thick CIR switch, side oats grama, Canada wild rye and flowers!

    Mowed it one time around July 4th. We will not mow again this year and possibly not next year even. Just playing it by ear yet. Burn after year three though.

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    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     

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