The old way...

Discussion in 'Iowa Whitetail Conference' started by Oct-Lull, Apr 22, 2015.

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  1. Oct-Lull

    Oct-Lull Active Member

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    I am sure many will take offense to what I have to say but I am sad thinking about where hunting has gone since I started years ago. A lot of the ethics have faded away. When I was young it was bad form to weasel in on another hunters spot, especially one seriously into the sport. Land access has pushed us away from that. Hunting used to be more about the time in the tree and the one on one challenge in killing a giant. More and more I see footage of huge bucks standing in a food plot being killed from a heated blind. We are using more and more advanced bows and crossbows are talked about as another addition to our sport. Cellular cams are giving us another excuse to stay at home, warm blinds keep is out of the trees, food plots keep is from killing deer on their terms in a natural environment. Everyone has the right to do what they want to on their own farms. There are reasons why we all do what we do. I am a fan of the old way. Hard to say if I would think different if I had unlimited land and money. But for today, I relish going into an area with regular farm layout and harvest and find a shooter, pattern him and hopefully overmatch him in his environment. Yes I use some trail cams, and I have a z7 extreme so I am not in the stone age. But shed dogs and 4/wheelers are out for me. Are there many of us left? I am sure some are even more conservative than I. I dont know if easier is always better. Oh and the "grass is always greener" guys I am not a fan of either, often causes bad feelings.
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2015
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  3. Boonervilleusa

    Boonervilleusa Well-Known Member

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    I'm not an old timer. I'm only 28, but in many ways I agree with you. Tv hunters have made the sport a competition. Regular hunters are now concerned about being better than their buddies, or killing bigger bucks than anyone else around the area. There isn't anything wrong with that perse but the problem has arisen from the incredible amount of competition between hunters. Never in my life did I imagine fellow hunters would get fighting mad about someone else shooting a deer they were after, or cause trouble with landowners to keep others from getting permission close to them. It's really getting out of hand. The average hunter is disappearing. Now you have to have enough $$$ to afford a big lease(and take it from folks who have been hunting it for free for years) or farm just for hunting in order to be what most consider "successful" on a consistent basis. I'll be the first to admit I like trail cameras and food plots...a lot! But I do agree that much of the increase of their use is due to one hunter trying to constantly one up another. I remember my dad talking about finding a big track or rub and wondering what the buck looked like...spending 2 or 3 years narrowing down his area and being surprised when you see him the first time. Now when a big buck is killed, the hunters many times know the deers entire life story via pictures, sheds, etc. The element of surprise is somewhat gone. There isn't anything wrong with doing that either...I'm guilty of it myself...but the hunting culture has definitely changed
     
  4. Daver

    Daver PMA Member

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    In the main, I agree with the sentiment of preferring the "olden days" of deer hunting more than what is common today. (Note - I am not disparaging anyone and I also use some of the modern methods and tools myself.)

    Back in the day, I can remember thinking we were geniuses when we tied fishing line across a deer trail and came back 24 hours later and found that something had passed through the area, as the line was knocked down. :D Wow, talk about intel!! Our minds boggled at the thought of how big Mr. Big was...even though in reality it was probably a forkhorn that passed through. :D We thought we were the cats! :D Nowadays, almost everyone has pics galore of every deer on the farm and have named and categorized them...for real.

    There are a lot of similar anecdotes that I could share...but here a couple counter points...back in the day, EVERY buck got shot and no one even knew what the term "4 year old" meant. Some things have definitely gotten less tasteful, but some other things have improved too. Now it is very common for people to elect not to shoot every antlered buck that they have an opportunity to do so.

    Also, habitat improvement is light years better today than 20+ years ago. If you would used the term "food plot" 20 years ago, someone would have looked at you like you were purple. :D
     
  5. IowaChiro

    IowaChiro Member

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    I agree, and shows like whitetail properties pushing land, leases and such are going to kill hunting for the non wealthy.
     
  6. Tim Hull

    Tim Hull PMA Member

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    I don't believe it is killing hunting for the non-wealthy. I am in no means Wealthy, but I purchased 50 acres but I don't take 2 drinking vacations to the Bahamas every year. It is harder to find land to hunt as much of it is being leased or put into smaller sections. The urban sprawl is also of no help to hunting as I have last hunting land to the expanding city. Nothing stays the same forever. If you want it bad enough, almost everyone can purchase property if you make the sacrifices necessary. You might have to drive an older truck and live in a smaller house, but most can do it. I have friends that want to buy property but live in a bigger house in a fancy neighborhood and can't afford it, your choice.
     
  7. arm

    arm Leg

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    Thanks Tim...I was thinking the exact same

    Sent from my XT1030 using IW
     
  8. Sod Savage

    Sod Savage Member

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    I personally have decided a year or two ago, to just go back to shooting deer and having a good time. If I get lucky and a big one comes by hopefully my aim is true. Otherwise a small buck will still be just as much fun. The horns still get displayed at the camp, and actually I have a better time butchering my deer anymore than I do hunting them. Well maybe its about the same amount of funness. To each their own, I am not worried about it.

    At the end of the day how many 170 inchers will your kids need to throw away when you're dead? And whos to say that 170 incher wouldn't be 200 next year or that 200 next year be 250 the next year? Where do you draw the line? Any more I draw the line when I feel like it.
     
  9. StickersNKickers

    StickersNKickers Camo Up!

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    One thing is for sure, I would spend a lot less time and money on hunting if I did it the "old way". Ok, maybe not time, as I'd probably spend more time on foot scouting trails, bedding areas, etc, instead of walking in to check trail cams. Time in the stand would probably be about the same I'm guessing, as even with the scouting I do now plus trail cams, I have yet to pattern a target buck. I still have to get lucky. I suppose with the "old way", I may not have a target buck, unless I had seen it prior to the season or had sheds from the year before. Kinda hard to hold out for the big boy if you don't know he exists.

    Regarding the comment about bad form to move in on someone else's hunting spot, I was presented this exact opportunity a couple years ago. I was offered a place to bow hunt, which was also hunted by another guy He only gun hunted, so we wouldn't have been hunting at the same time anyway. I was even offered use of his stand. I turned it down because I didn't want to use someone else's stand and didn't want to mess up his spot. I also had other places to hunt, so didn't really need it.
     
  10. 203ntyp

    203ntyp PMA Member

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    I agree, hunting tactics have changed with technology and it takes away from the true meaning of fair chase. Before trail cams I spent several days a week scouting from a distance, sometimes without binoculars, just wanted to learn their habits by watching them first hand and would do this a year long. As the season started I hunted from the ground only back in the day with my recurve in hand, taking my time to investigate every trail, hoof print dropping, bed and rub. You never knew what was really going to show up and it added to the adrenaline, when the moment of truth came it was most rewarding.

    What would a guy do today without a cell phone to communicate with a buddy or let the wife know you were going to be late looking for a deer. I much prefer the old way.
     
  11. retiredmurph

    retiredmurph Member

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    Old age is a terrible thing to happen to a fellow, back in 1985 when I first bought my place I walked every square foot of the 120 acres. A tree stand was a 2x12 with a notch cut in both ends and place in the V of two limbs. We had just got our first compound bow and not sure if we wanted to give up the recurve.

    Fast forward 30 years and at 70 years old the knees and legs are about gone. Oh I could still run the mile, If you give me two weeks to do it in. You can say what you want about using a 4 wheeler but I'll not give up huntin as long as I can sill get out.

    I'm now in that stage of deer hunting where I spend more time helping youth and the disabled vets to get into a stand and take a deer of their choice. I still like my deer hunting but shooting monster bucks has no meaning to me. I enjoy building blinds, planting food plots and helping others have the opportunity to deer hunt.

    Everyone has an opinion of what deer hunting should be and as far as I'm concerned as long as they are legal, they're all ok. Just enjoy the outdoors while we can. Times are changing and not all for the better I'm afraid.
     
  12. Ted's Taxidermy NE Iowa

    Ted's Taxidermy NE Iowa Life Member

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    I've seen your offerings to help all kinds of people RetiredMurph. I can see how you would enjoy that more than killing one yourself. I know I would. Great sportsmanship.
     
  13. evey

    evey Member

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    Who has thought of giving up cameras and do it the old way? I have thought about it but like it much as Hunting...
     
  14. Liv4Rut

    Liv4Rut Active Member

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    Since I have had kids I have very little time to hunt or scout. I don't run cameras, I hunt public ground in various counties, study aerials, topos from home and slide in during the rut with my LW and hunt new spots or spots I have hunted in the past. Works for me.
     
  15. SaskGuy

    SaskGuy Active Member

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    Good thread. I don't know what constitutes as old school but I suppose I see myself there.
    I knock on doors and get permission on lands that others do as well and use what the land itself offers, no baits (I'm too cheap) or plots, just the land as it is used by whatever landowner it belongs to.
    I don't have the newest and or fanciest anything, but any modern weapon is not old school I suppose. My rifle I bought at 16 years of age, my muzzleloader is about 12
    years old, my bow is not worth a fortune.
    I use trail cameras over salt blocks and scrapes because I like the images and it is another part of the game I enjoy. 2006 was the last year I killed anything from either a ground blind or a stand. The natural cover provides me more mobility and money. lol
    I've used my quad, (you guys say four wheeler) once in all of my hunting or shed hunting excursions and that was this year to drag and animal from the forest. I won't say I won't again.
    It works, both for hunting and for my lifestyle.
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2015
  16. Booner

    Booner Well-Known Member

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    This is what it's about....

    I completely thought after reading "Since I have kids and have little time to hunt scout" that you were going to be one of those guys :D:D

    But really, it gets old hearing people use handicaps (not enough time for this, can't scout properly, can't afford this, bla bla bla) as excuses. If you have a passion for something you'll find a way to get it done.

    I personally don't know what the "old" way would be considered since the day I started bow hunting (12yrs ago), dad and I have been running cameras (still have that old 9mm camera that film held 40 pictures and every couple weeks we'd rush to Walmart 24hour to get it developed) Can't imagine going back to that way :p
     
  17. Oct-Lull

    Oct-Lull Active Member

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    I am surprised and happy that there are some of us left. I also have young kids and dont have the time I once had. Dont care one bit either. It has given me perspective I didn't have before. I used to be headed the wrong direction, lost friends, lost sleep, spent more time worried about other guys staying out of my way and it made it no fun. Filmed for a while and that made it worse. Now I just want to hunt and spend time outside especially with my kids. I dont want to stop walking to my cameras to check them, I live sitting strapped to a tree watching light snow fall in the heart of the season. I know public land has its challenges but we are all on the same level, no quads, no preferences. Natural environment. I dont care if I take my tag home, and I dont care who knows what I shoot or what's on the wall. I have my standards and I stick to them. My kids think I am a terrible hunter because I dont bring one home each time! Ha! Everyone does it their own way. But most, not all of us started doing this to spend time outdoors and love to watch the woods do its thing knowing nothing about our presence. Its pretty cool I think. I also wouldnt most likely want to give up my cameras because it's fun to pull that card. Can't say I haven't thought about it on days they dont work quite right! But I enjoy hunting state and not knowing what coming by next.
     
  18. skyleralan

    skyleralan PMA Member

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    I just do it "my way". Which is I think a blend of everything. I do enjoy habitat improvement and some food plots, but some of that is more out of enjoyment and satisfaction. All of our farms that were once farmed and worked by my grandparents on both sides are now in CRP. No one on either side really does much of anything out there. Part of my enjoyment is knowing that when I start a project out there or improve something I like to think my grandparents are proud of me. My grandpa on my dad's side died when I was young, I was only 12. Yes, I have many memories, but always wish I had more time. I have been blessed in terms of land access and our family still keeping both farms. It has allowed for my hobby and love for hunting to grow and expand. My goal is to be able to purchase the family farm when it ever comes to that point.

    In the end, I am going to do what works best for me. I do use trail cams, and have a bow from 2012. I do enjoy watching deer grow and building a history with them. That might not be for everyone and that is OK. I don't always agree with other hunters and that is fine. I personally won't give my opinion unless someone asks for it.
     
  19. Hawk32

    Hawk32 Active Member

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    Oct-lull

    You couldn't of taken the words out of my mouth any better than that. Man I hear everything your saying. Right on, x10. Don't get me wrong I love running cameras and failing over and over at food plots but I look at that stuff more as an opportunity to spend time with a buddy and being outdoors teaching my little boys and not as much as doing it to kill a booner. My 6 year old son wonders every time I come home empty handed why i never killed a buck this year and doesn't quite grasp I had a perfect season taking 4 does for the freezer. I'm sure at some point I was in the same situation as you and looked in the mirror one day and realized this isn't what its suppose to be about. Thank goodness I had some good mentors/friends 25 years ago and still today that helped determine that path. I've watched too many friends and family ruin relationships over deer hunting.

    As much as I love this sport there sure are things that aggravate the heck out me. I guess in the new school of hunting its all about running around at sporting good events soliciting sponsors, trying to get free crap, selling replicas, or paying hundreds of dollars to sit behind a booth and pimp yourself out as a superstar hunter. All this leads back to the commercialization of hunting. Not sure whats worse. those that want to get something for nothing or those that feel the need utilize a resource such as deer hunting to make a dollar or make themselves out to be something they are not. Then not give anything back to the state or the organizations that have enabled us to have what we have. On a similar note, another new school of thought, I sat at the deer classic listening to a conversation between and IBA officer and gentleman he was trying to sell a membership to. The response from the gentleman was "why would I want to do that-I sell real-estate for living-why would I support them" Seems like a pretty hypercritical way of thinking to me. Prospering off something that organizations like the IBA and many others that have fought to maintain(great hunting) for all but not willing to give back to it one bit. I know this isn't everyones way of thinking but unfortunately its way to many. To those that do give back and to those who continue down the "old school way of thought" I thank you.
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2015
  20. adamo

    adamo Member

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    I would consider myself old fashioned... although I do have a new bow and a few other equipment. I go to the treestand to enjoy the outdoors, I hunt the way I want to, and I do not give people grief for doing it the way they want. I am also in the stage of having two kids of hunting age and taking them out means more than anything to me.

    I once witnessed a guy shoot a buck while sitting in one of my stands – rather than get mad, I simply went over and congratulated him. Spent the rest of the morning taking pictures for him and helping drag it ¼ mile. Once I was rifle hunting public land and saw a father and kid sitting a few ridges down from me. I let a nice 140”ish buck go past me as I knew it was heading in their direction. That was the first buck for that young man.

    But, I am disturbed by "new age" hunter personality. I have basically stopped measuring for B&C/P&Y because of it – not that I don’t believe in their actions(I’m still a member), I just got tired of people not being happy with a deer that measured 150 instead of 160. Last year I had a situation that made me seriously doubt our sport. I was standing behind my truck in the dark getting my gear gathered up. Out of nowhere, a gigantic truck sped down the gravel, slammed on his brakes and flew right in front of my truck (closer to the entrance). I decided to go to another spot, as the cloud of dust settled and my headlights came on, the kid was standing outside his truck with one hand on his crotch and the other giving me the finger. Didn't surprise me that he had facepaint to make a KISS fan jealous, oversized tires and lift kit on the truck and it was entirely covered in decals showing blood splatter, etc. One decal that stuck out to me said "I kill, because I want to". I kind of giggled and thought, ya that seems about right and moved to another spot. It wore on me all day as I wondered what hunting had come to, and why do people think they have to look/act like bad-asses to be a hunter. I thought about going back and having a nice talk with the young man, but knew that would do no good. The only thing I could think of to do my part was to raise my young hunters as good sportsmen who respect the animal, land and others. Hopefully more are doing the same.
     
  21. nelson81

    nelson81 New Member

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    Agreed, Well said.
     

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