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Herbicides

MK111

New Member
Imox vs thistles.

3 yrs ago I had 10-15 thistles show up in my one clover plot. Not understanding thistles I just pulled them and cut off at the ground. 2 yrs ago I had a lot more so I mowed them 4 times during the summer.
Come this spring and the 3rd year I discovered I had a patch of solid thistles 1/2 ac.
That's when I did research and found out that thistles have a main root and it must be killed completely or else new shoots will come up and spread.
Have I got my thoughts correct on this?

So in April I ordered Imox from Keystone and the required fertilizer additive. The spring turned wet and couldn't get on the plot until April 3rd at which time the thistles were already 30" high and ready to go to a bud. So I sprayed Imox and additive on the plot.
On April 10th the leaves were started to turn yellow so I bush hogged the plot to get rid of the maturing thistles.
In couple weeks to my surprise the whole thistle patch was flush with new plants 5-6" high.
So on July 5th I did the 2nd spray of Imox. But by July 5th at least the new plants didn't get any more growth and were still 5-6" high.

On Aug 13 I bush hogged the plot again and the new thistle plants were only 8-10" high and no buds.

I think I bush hogged the 1st time after 7 days too early and didn't give the Imox time to work it's way to the roots. Does this seem correct thinking?

At least now I have 80% less thistles, and will get after them 1st thing next spring.

Any improvments I need to do?
 

Sligh1

Administrator
Staff member
Sure sounds good to me!! I blasted some with liberty & 2,4-d & toasted em. Stuff like crossbow, etc used. Imox is a new one to me I’m trying but not for thistles. A lot of guys on here have thistle messes so i know their expertise on those is top notch.

Only thing I can think of is rotating out where u can nuke things with some other herbicides so the thistles continue to be hit with different methods. 2,4-d will be in there. Triclopyr + 2,4-d be great. I think that’s “crossbow”. After spray & be some time to replant. If u r dead set on leaving in clover.... One could keep on the imox or maybe nuke it for a year & replant a year later. One other idea.... if it’s feasible.... go get some dicamba soybeans and plant those for a summer. Plenty of options & as long as u mix it up - u will get ahead of them & on em.
 

Daver

PMA Member
Anyone have experience with Arrest Max? I sprayed a week ago. Grass was fairly tall. A lot of it is rye grain from last fall. Looked today and appears untouched.
Does this stuff need more time? Should I mow and hit it again? I kept seeing lots of opinions before hand. Some said mow first, others said don’t. Clover plot.

I am not sure what Arrest Max is, but spraying anything at this time of the year in hopes to kill can be challenging sometimes. If stuff is up and growing well then "normal" herbicide application may not kill things the way you want. I would mow it, let it come back up a little and then hit it.
 

Nrharris

Active Member
Looks like arrest max is a generic Select Max (clethodium). Was it cold when you sprayed. Sometimes if it's been cold and weeds/grass aren't actively growing it's tough to kill them. Also from my experience clethodium isnt a real fast killer so it may still do the job. Or it could be like daver said, it can be tough if the grass is pretty big or starting to head out.
 

cybball

PMA Member
Looks like arrest max is a generic Select Max (clethodium). Was it cold when you sprayed. Sometimes if it's been cold and weeds/grass aren't actively growing it's tough to kill them. Also from my experience clethodium isnt a real fast killer so it may still do the job. Or it could be like daver said, it can be tough if the grass is pretty big or starting to head out.

Was 70’s when I sprayed. It’s cleth, so maybe it takes a while. I’ll mow it next weekend and see how it’s reacting.
Thanks!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

IowaBowHunter1983

Super Moderator
Staff member
Was 70’s when I sprayed. It’s cleth, so maybe it takes a while. I’ll mow it next weekend and see how it’s reacting.
Thanks!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Did you use crop oil? Cleth requires it.

Cleth is very slow to work. Can take several weeks for grass to die.

I wouldn't mow personally. I found issues with grass coming back before allowing cleth to fully work
 

cybball

PMA Member
Did you use crop oil? Cleth requires it.

Cleth is very slow to work. Can take several weeks for grass to die.

I wouldn't mow personally. I found issues with grass coming back before allowing cleth to fully work

I did add crop oil.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

arm

Leg
I think this weed is butterweed. Common I think but idk why I can't place that name. If something else I'm open. Question about it, it's pretty tall by now...wondering if I should spray it now or just mow it and spray it later (thinking it will kill better of I mow it down). Planting corn in there soon.
Screenshot_20210428-112154_Chrome.jpg
 

Sligh1

Administrator
Staff member
I think this weed is butterweed. Common I think but idk why I can't place that name. If something else I'm open. Question about it, it's pretty tall by now...wondering if I should spray it now or just mow it and spray it later (thinking it will kill better of I mow it down). Planting corn in there soon. View attachment 120827
Are you trying to no-till the corn or are you going to work it? That would change my answer....
1) no till.... if it were mine for a plot... I’d be mowing it. I’d hit it with a good corn combo herbicide (pre & post- like Gly + 2-3 other groups I can list some names of) ... & likely plan on 2 passes. (*That also means treated urea on surface if this is a corn plot. or If this is ag stuff - clearly anhydrous or liquid. )
2) working ground.... you have lots of options..... could go hit with Gly & 2,4-d to get it dead & work it a bit after that when conditions are nice. Your next tools will be a post emergent with several groups. Such as: atrazine or simazine, metolachlor (dual) & mesotrione..... all this u can buy separate or as a “branded mix” which is just fine as well. Tons of those mixes & options to choose from. I can chime in more there if needed on specific herbicide combos anyone on here can buy or put together.

Either option will work of course with +/- to each. In general, to anyone, might think a touch more on no till if there’s cases where it might be a dry spring & summer. I like no till & getting it to work is fun
 

Sligh1

Administrator
Staff member
Bit older file (couple years maybe so still pretty darn current) but this covers the “groups”. Just need a basic understanding for corn or beans that u want a “few groups” put down .... when & why. Covers different weeds & works differently.
it also lists post emergents & even things like “clethodim” or whatever for grass issues in plantings.
I’ll post a couple in case one is more clear. I can find link again too if needed.
5606174A-3D58-4328-A0B8-879A195960E6.jpeg

425029BC-D00D-4FA6-AFA1-F0CB5BC3545E.jpeg
18581338-BFA8-4512-9FB7-70742EC6D396.jpeg
 

arm

Leg
Well, I won't pretent to know what any of that means :) I plan to spray posts as many times as I need to be able to broadcast some fall seed in there later. Left on 38" rows to help on that, I think. Might regret it, idk
 

Sligh1

Administrator
Staff member
Well, I won't pretent to know what any of that means :) I plan to spray posts as many times as I need to be able to broadcast some fall seed in there later. Left on 38" rows to help on that, I think. Might regret it, idk
Start with understanding “post emergent” & “pre emergent”...
A post emergent like glyphosate (round up) kills actively growing plants. Many post emergents, like Gly, won’t stop any weeds from coming up right after spraying.

A pre-emergent keeps weeds from coming in for an extended period of time. Often allowing the said crop/seed to grow with less or no competition.
Labels will help with this & usually a combination of post & pre emergents is the best tactic for most plantings, especially longer season
 
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