Roundup Ready Corn & Soybean Food Plot

Discussion in 'Dbltree's corner' started by dbltree, Jan 17, 2006.

  1. Central Iowa

    Central Iowa Administrator

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    Re: RR soybeans

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> Isn't there an EAGLE seed deeler in Grainger, IA?</div></div>
    For the Eagle soys give Terry with Midwest Food Plots an email or pm.

    PM midwestfoodplots

    Midwest Food Plots
     
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  3. midwestfoodplots

    midwestfoodplots New Member

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    Re: RR soybeans

    Hey guys I've been out of touch for several weeks, but if any of you need the Eagle Soybeans, I'll have them next year again.
     
  4. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Re: RR soybeans - soil testing

    Little "frosty" out right now at minus 20 give or take but still we want to start thinking about soil fertility requirments for both soys and corn.

    Here's some good links to more information on what we need to test for and why.

    Soybean Nutrient Requirements

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><span style='font-size: 11pt'>Soybean Nutrient Requirements</span>


    <span style="color: #CC0000"><span style='font-size: 11pt'>Fertilizing prior to soybean production is not a common practice in Iowa. Nutrient deficiencies in soybean are rare and current recommendations in Iowa are to apply additional nutrients only if soil tests indicate that a specific nutrient is at a low concentration or if deficiencies are identified in the field.</span></span>

    Deficiencies are rare even though the soybean plant requires more nitrogen than corn, and as a result can fix up to 50% of its own nitrogen.

    </div></div>

    Generally most ag operations rotate between corn and soybeans and maintain high fertility levels when planting corn and then do not need any when planting beans.

    In a food plot situation this may not be the case so a soil test is the best way to tell.

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><span style='font-size: 11pt'>Essential Nutrients</span>

    Specific nutrients such as nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) are the three most important soil supplied nutrients and are called essential nutrients. There are several other nutrients important for plant growth such as calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), iron (Fe), boron (B), manganese (Mn), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), and molybdenum (Mo) that are needed at much lower concentrations and are limiting only in certain environments.

    </div></div>


    PH is very important to soybeans and maintaining it through soil testing and lime applications is also important.

    Soybeans - Liming and Fertilization

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Soybeans grow best on soils of medium to high fertility and with a favorable soil pH

    Soil testing is critical for determining fertility needs. Soybeans require moderate amounts of plant food for high yields. A 30-bushel yield removes 24 pounds of phosphate and 42 pounds of potash in the grain per acre. Some soils are high in fertility and can supply everything the plant needs; however, many soils require supplemental fertility for maximum production.

    </div></div>

    Fertilizer Recommendations For Soybeans

    Even though we are not harvesting our beans, not all of it is being "deposited" back in our food plots so some additional fertlizer may be required.

    Soil sampling and fertility management

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> <span style='font-size: 11pt'>Soil sampling</span>

    Plant nutrient applications through fertilizer and/or lime should be based on soil tests. Soil tests help to determine the soil pH and nutrient levels, and thus any need for lime and/or fertilizer applications. </div></div>
     
  5. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Re: RR soybeans - soil testing

    Soybeans aren't for everyone but for those having problems attracting deer to brassicas (for instance) soybeans are a pretty good food source to consider.

    I like soybeans because the offer so many options, especially the fact that one can broadcast winter rye and/or brassicas into standing soys in late August.

    For that type of plan I would consider more "normal" early ripening soys that will drop leaves early allowing light to the rye and brassicas.

    Of course for the month of September while leaves are turning and dropping, deer are going to avoid the plot like the plague!

    My concern is not October however...it's November, December and January so that is something to consider when planting forage soybeans. They provide a tremendous amount of high quality forage right up until freeze...then however, they drop leaves right smack in the middle of prime time hunting.

    Eagle brand forage soybeans is working on a mix of early and late that might help with that problem but forage soys are so thick and tall rye and brassicas would have almost no chance of growing.

    No right or wrong, just options to consider depending on your habitat needs.

    I really like nannyslayers "bush" type RR soybeans and the did pretty darn good despite being hammered hard by my deer.

    [​IMG]

    They produced loads of beans despite the heavy grazing, however I didn't have enough to be assured of late feed so I disced them under to plant rye and oats.

    One option is to no-till into a field of rye making it difficult for deer to feed on the new soy plants until they get larger and the rye begins to fall.

    The rye will eventually fall and and seed will germinate again in late summer if one gets plenty of rain. One needs to spray roundup ahead of any re-seeding efforts of course... /forum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/wink.gif

    By using Dual Magnum then soybeans, peas and sourghum can be mixed together with the sorghum providing a screen and an "obstacle" to deer trying to ravage new soy plants.

    Eagle Brand soys also has a vining type soy that will grow up corn, sorghum and sunflowers making that a great option as well.

    Nannyslayer tells me his soys will run roughly $38-40 a bag while Eagle could be much higher due to shipping costs but for some the forage attributes may be well worth the extra costs.

    Eagle Seed Forage Soybeans

    I have purchased year old RR soybeans for $15 a bag so check your local seed dealer for bargain priced seed also.

    I like to plant 200,000 to 220,000 seeds per acre which is a little on the high side. Seeds per pound can vary but using 2800 seeds per pound a 50# bag would have 140,000 seeds in it.

    Roughly 1 to 1-1/2 bags of soybean seed then will plant an acre.

    If you choose the RR varieties, generic glyphosate looks like it will run just under $40 a gallon in 2009.

    As noted in the previous post, take a soil test anytime now to determine soil fertility needs as soy ground often needs lime and potash.

    All of that is way less expensive then planting corn since no nitrogen is needed.

    Lots of options with soybeans and it's unlikely you'll have to worry about deer not eating them... /forum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/wink.gif
     
  6. petherss

    petherss New Member

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    Re: RR soybeans - soil testing

    A quick question for those who have tried corn/soy plots. I am thinking about broadcasting instead of planting in rows. I just don't have the equipment to plant in rows and I honestly want the corn more for cover than anything. I know it's a shotgun method where you'll have pockets of heavy corn and light corn.

    My question lies in spraying for weeds. Obviously I am going with RR corn/soys, but I've read that a lot of people who broadcast then spray once weeds become an issue......wouldn't running a tractor and spray rig over the corn/soys kill them? or will they pop back up? Thanks
     
  7. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Re: RR soybeans - soil testing

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I've read that a lot of people who broadcast then spray once weeds become an issue......wouldn't running a tractor and spray rig over the corn/soys kill them? or will they pop back up? </div></div>

    It won't hurt the soys and some folks claim they run over corn with ATV sprayers and it "bounces" back...could be so, but my tractor crushes corn if I run over it so I try not to do so.

    I have sprayed up to an acre with my backpack sprayer to avoid running over older corn/soybeans.

    Even if you break some down you should still have plenty left so go ahead and broadcast...no worries there!

    Please share some pics with us as your plot progesses this summer /forum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/cool.gif
     
  8. Riley17

    Riley17 New Member

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    Like the people that already responded there are a couple of companies offering a corn/bean mix. I think thi sis ideal for Iowa! However, I read on the bag the percentage of corn and it was very low. My friends in South Dakota offer a product called CanaMaize, it is a grazing corn. It's high in flint and very digestable. It grows to only 4.5 to 5 feet high and can handle the pressure of planting with say a 70 day bean. I would mix 1 to 1. In addition some try to broadcast. Thi scan be expensive! With the small seed size of CanaMize you can go ahead and drill it righ tin with the beans. Go to http://www.canamaizeus.com for more info. It works!
     
  9. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Which row width is best for soybeans? </div></div>

    Farmers are always tweaking things like that so any number of answers are possible but here but here's what ISU has to say on the subject. Row spacing

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><span style='font-size: 11pt'>In most cases, there is no difference between 7.5, 10, 15, or 20 inch row spacing and anything less than 30 inch is therefore consider narrow row spacing.

    Most of these studies have concluded that planting soybean in narrow rows will increase yields with the largest increases in yield occurring in the northern Corn Belt.
    </span> </div></div>

    I have a 4 row JD no-till planter with 38" row spacings so I go over it twice planting inbetween the first rows.

    If you have a drill it will most likely have 7.5 inch spacings which is also fine, just adjust the seed per acre to keep it somewhere between 140,000 to 220,000 seeds per acre.

    Seeding rate can vary down to as low as 100,000 seeds per acre but generally food plot soybeans get hit pretty hard, so upping planting rates to high end levels will be fine.

    Soybean Update

    Soybean Seeding Rate and Row Width Effect on Yield
     
  10. petherss

    petherss New Member

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    Ok guys, need some help. I have been wanting to buy a corn planter for awhile now. I know someone that is wanting to sell his planter. I know nothing about them. He says this planter has been stored for the last 5 years and the previous owner stored it for 10+ years before that. It looks to be in decent shape (especially since it looks like an older model). Does this look to be in decent shape to you? Any ideas on the model? The guy said he doesn't know exactly, but thought it might be a model 71? Also, any ballpark guess on what it is worth? Thanks!!

    [​IMG]
     
  11. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Looks like a 71 to me

    here's a pic of one all painted up

    [​IMG]

    They wanted $3000 for that one BTW /forum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/eek.gif /forum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/shocked.gif

    It will have plates I believe so you just need to get plates to match the seed or vice versa.

    Should be a great little planter! /forum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/cool.gif
     
  12. Skully

    Skully PMA Member

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    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: dbltree</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Looks like a 71 to me

    here's a pic of one all painted up

    [​IMG]

    They wanted $3000 for that one BTW /forum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/eek.gif /forum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/shocked.gif
    </div></div>

    WOW that green paint is expensive!!!! /forum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/shocked.gif /forum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/grin.gif Wonder what it cost back in the day when it was new?
     
  13. petherss

    petherss New Member

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    $3,000?? Wow. So I guess $350 is a decent deal eh? I see planters that have been gone thru and painted anywhere from $850-$1200 but haven't seen too many sold the way they are. Is there anything that goes wrong with these that I need to watch for? springs/bearings that need greasing etc?
     
  14. Critter

    Critter Life Member

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    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: dbltree</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Looks like a 71 to me

    here's a pic of one all painted up

    [​IMG]

    They wanted $3000 for that one BTW /forum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/eek.gif /forum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/shocked.gif


    </div></div>

    You gotta' be kidding me.............
     
  15. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: BUCKCRACK</div><div class="ubbcode-body">$3,000?? Wow. So I guess $350 is a decent deal eh? I see planters that have been gone thru and painted anywhere from $850-$1200 but haven't seen too many sold the way they are. Is there anything that goes wrong with these that I need to watch for? springs/bearings that need greasing etc? </div></div>

    It's unreal what these planters go for...just cause of foodplotters! I paid $1250 for my 4 row JD no-till plateless planter but I suspect many of those would sell for 2-3 times that now.

    You going to have a couple chains and a few grease zerks now doubt but nothing you can't fix up.

    For $350...you can by a LOT of parts! /forum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/wink.gif

    Just go pickup some spare chain links and you shouldn't have any major problems... /forum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/cool.gif

    Here's a couple online ads......

    JD 7000 Planters

    The planters in this ad are an older type with a "shoe"

    Ebay Source

    2 row JD 7000

    Here's one for 900 bucks...

    JD 71 Planter

    This shows planter depth adjustment in the front

    [​IMG]

    Looks pretty simple to me! /forum/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/cool.gif
     
  16. Sligh1

    Sligh1 Administrator Staff Member

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    QUESTION/SCENARIO: I have FOUR acres I have limed and fertilized in the middle of my farm that I am going to drill round-up ready soybeans in. Because it's so secluded and there's so many deer- it is going to get HAMMERED!

    When do you feel I should plant the beans to give them the best shot at making it: Before others have beans planted, early (probably make mine the only target), when everyone else plants their beans OR after most other beans are planted by neighbors?

    Is there any other thoughts you have for quick or long maturing beans, seed rate (probably 36 inch rows BUT plant DOUBLE so 18" rows), etc. My GOAL is to have as many pods left in late December/January as possible without deer destroying before then.

    (enough acres with 4? It is fertilized like crazy. Ever consider that plot saver stuff?).

    Thanks!!!
     
  17. waltrogers

    waltrogers Ms Delta

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    when to plant beans...

    Skip, From what I've seen in Ms, late planted beans get hammered. My guess is that they are the best tasting thing around if planted late in the season after most beans are planted. I've seen early planted beans do quite well and I assume there are other things in the woods that the deer prefer early in the year. I've seen a couple of late planted bean crops (planted for deer) get decimated while a field 400 yards away and planted earlier in the year for agricultural purposes, does fine.

    Headed to Iowa in a few minutes!
     
  18. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Good luck with that...;):rolleyes::D

    That's my goal too but they murder 6 acres at my place long before hunting season and I plant 220,000 seeds per acre...bout as high as you can go!

    If the field is protected they'll be all over it but it's always hard to say for sure.

    I'd take Walt's advice and get em planted so they have 1/2 a chance...:)
     
  19. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Got my soybeans no-till planted on May 12th 2009 with my JD 7000 and my friends Big Red :way:
    [​IMG]

    Because I have very high deer density and it's a hidden field I planted a very high population in excess of 250,000 seeds per acre! :shock: Deer will hammer these beans hard however so I'll be lucky if any survive at all let alone have to worry about "overcrowding"... ;)

    3230 seeds per pound (note the seeds per # is always listed on the bag) gave me 161,500 seeds per bag.

    [​IMG]

    A friend borrowed it last year and "poured" seed from it so I always check to see if seed is coming out and how thick right in the driveway where seeds will be exposed.

    Too thick!

    [​IMG]

    The 7000 has a "driver" sprocket and then adjustable "driven" sprockets and a chart in the book that tells me the combination needed to plant the desired #'s per acre.

    Which left the seed coming out like this...

    [​IMG]
     
  20. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    It's an older wide row planter with spacings set at 38" so I go over the field twice when planting soybeans. The field was in rye last year and parts of it I sowed red clover in last fall as well. I noticed last year that soybeans grew quite well where I over planted into a clover patch, so I no-till planted right into the rye and clover.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The rye was broadcast on untilled ground and some places it's not very thick and there is no clover, so I'll be able to compare.

    [​IMG]

    The soil was reasonably dry so the rows were barely visable

    [​IMG]
     
  21. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    The tire marks in the rye and clover were the only telltale signs I had been there

    [​IMG]

    My hope is that the rye and clover will protect the soybeans at first from heavy grazing and then eventually I'll nuke it all with roundup. I'm planning on re-broadcasting rye into the standing soybeans in late summer so have a combination of grain (soybeans) and green (cereal rye) this fall.

    Some area's a triple planted to use up the seed putting the population up in excess of 330,000 seeds per acre, I realy expect deer to mow them anyway however so we'll keep tabs on them and see how they do. ;)
     

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