Sugarbeets

Discussion in 'Dbltree's corner' started by dbltree, Apr 14, 2009.

  1. bowhuntr311

    bowhuntr311 IowaWhitetail Addict

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    Dbltree do you know why? And if so is there a way to prevent it?
     
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  3. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    No...I'm not certain why? I just planted a few seeds I had left over in my garden to see if they come up better or the same?

    I had brassicas in there the previous year and brassicas have strong allelopathic chemicals that can inhibit some seeds from germinating or growing. Usually this is a plus because it controls weeds but it also can prevent clover from growing.

    Perhaps it had nothing to do with it but the plot never had any appreciable amount of weeds.

    I also wondered if I hadn't planted them deep enough but research shows that .5/.75" depths are better then depths up to 1.25" as it mentions in this link:

    Planting Sugarbeets

    I'm still learning about sugarbeets so I will have to try some different things next year and see what works best.

    Sugarbeet Crop Fact Sheet

    All about Sugarbeets
     
  4. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Mike from WI sent a couple more pics showing the size of his sugarbeets at this stage of the game...

    [​IMG]

    Some real good growth!

    [​IMG]

    I've heard of a few other people who had had some pretty intense grazing on the tops which is something I'm afraid of. Pretty expensive seed if they won't leave it alone it fall.

    Obviously this isn't a problem for everyone but something to be aware of especially if they hit brassicas hard on your property now...;)
     
  5. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Mike from WI sent a recent pic of his sugarbeet development and they are looking good Mike! :way:

    [​IMG]

    Potential is there for tons of late winter feed if one can grow them without having them murdered early on.

    I would suggest anyone to test their own situation with brasicas first and see if they can grow a good crop of those first. If they kill them like mine then there is a good chance that your sugarbeets might not survive the summer.

    Deer will happily forage on beet tops just like brassica tops so keep that in mind before you deicde to plant them next spring.

    Nannyslayer (Brian) can get RR sugarbeet seed now that may be a little less expensive then what has been available so check with him before you buy seed next spring...;)
     
  6. letemgrow

    letemgrow PMA Member

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    If sugar beets were planted in the spring, they mature in 45 days correct so another round would have to be planted for that fall or would they do their own thing and reseed/grow without a re-plant??
     
  7. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Sugarbeets require a 150 to 120 day growing season Phil, so you plant them in the spring whereas short season brassicas are planted in mid summer as they require only 60-90 days.

    It sounds like RR sugarbeets may be off the table just like RR alfalfa while they duke things out in court so one might have to use conventional seed and herbicides for awhile...;)
     
  8. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    RR sugarbeet seed may be hard to come by until this is resolved...;)

    They are still fighting to get RR alfalfa re-approved so it may be awhile...
     
  9. homegrownbucks

    homegrownbucks New Member

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    Here is how mine turned out in Wisconsin, even with the drought they came out pretty good.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

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    [​IMG]
     
  10. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Wow! That's amazing growth!! Keep us posted on how deer use them this winter!:way:
     
  11. jmm46

    jmm46 Member

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    any winter pictures of the sugar beets people planted??
     
  12. bowhuntr311

    bowhuntr311 IowaWhitetail Addict

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    Anybody want to comment on the deer grazing of the tops. Looks to me like the stem and leaves are alot larger than most brassicas?
     
  13. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Several people complained that deer mowed the tops of the beets early on just as they did their brassicas, so that can be a problem in some cases.

    Others said deer didn't touch the the tops but are digging up the roots now so you can see that while beets are not brassicas, deer will treat them much the same.

    If they don't touch your brassicas through out the summer, the beets may also be safe until the late season. If they mow your brassica tops early on, I doubt that sugarbeets will work well for you....;)
     
  14. bowhuntr311

    bowhuntr311 IowaWhitetail Addict

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    Thier not? Reason? I figured beets were a relative of the turnip so I guessed beets would fall under the brassica name?

    In the event a person planted beets, and the deer did mow the tops early, I assume it would stunt the growth and/or kill the whole plant?
     
  15. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Sugar beets are members of the Chenopodiaceae family rather then the brassica family.

    If deer hammer the tops early on it will most certainly stunt root growth just as it does with brassicas...;)
     
  16. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    My friend Mike from up north in WI sent some update pics from his sugarbeet and brassica plots here in late January....

    Remember his summer time pics of his RR beets and beans planted together?? Dang they looked awesome!

    [​IMG]

    The pics of the big ole beets themselves!!:eek:

    [​IMG]

    and now it's January...bitter cold and tons of snow and here is his beet plot now!

    [​IMG]

    They are doing a right fine job of digging thru the snow and cleaning up anything they can get too!

    [​IMG]

    Now to be fair they are doing a number on his brassica plot as well...bulldozing snow away to forage on the turnips!

    [​IMG]

    Hmmm...so what...season is over right?

    Ahhh...not quite because now my friends shed season is open and Mike is cleaning up walking solely through his food plots!

    [​IMG]

    I have to say I am jealous of the beautiful plots Mike is able to grow up there while mine get grubbed off to the roots by the end of summer! I'm greatful Mike is willing to share his pictures and successes with us.

    As of right now RR beets will not be available in 2010 so we'll have to give conventional sugarbeet seed a try and use conventional herbcides on them.

    We'll discuss seed and herbicide options very soon! :way:
     
  17. Daver

    Daver PMA Member

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    I have a question...

    Clearly the deer are working hard to get to those beets and turnips, but is there such a thing as inadvertantly creating a "trap" by "making" them dig through frozen dirt to get to the food that could actually be undercutting the benefits of those food plots, at least when the ground is frozen solid?

    In other words, do they expend too much energy pawing at the frozen tundra relative to the nutrition that they get from gnawing on the tops?

    Nice plots and sheds, and those beets look awesome too. Certainly the deer were well fed there this fall.
     
  18. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    I guess my thoughts would be...what is their alternative? They are naturally going to use the least energy possible to gain the most nutritive value...in otherwords if there is better natural browse that requires less energy and has equal or greater nutritive value, they will seek it out.

    Otherwise they simply go hungry and lose weight, surviving but not thriving...;)
     
  19. Jetboatgreg

    Jetboatgreg New Member

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    dbltree....? i have on sugarbeets.

    We planted brassicas in several of our food plots this year. They came up great, deer ate the heck out of em. (if i had to do over i would have planted about 2 weeks earlier than i did so they would have grown a tad larger)

    Can i grow sugarbeets in those plots this year without them getting diseased?
    As i understand it you should not plant brassicas in successive years. After this years success with them i wish i could!

    What else would your recommend for hunting plots and or late fall/winter feedings for the flea bags!:D

    G
     
  20. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    Beets are not brassicas so I am not aware of any possible disease problems between the two but they are heavy nitrogen users and have other similarities so anything is possible.

    The best bet is to not plant only one crop in any plot or field but to divide it into strips or blocks so you can have multiple food sources growing at the same time and then rotate them each year.

    Corn, soybeans and alfalfa are common ag crop rotations that help farmers control disease and pest problems and the corn will utilize any nitrogen from the legumes as they decompose.

    In the same manner we can plant clover, brassicas (or beets) and cereal grain mixtures (winter rye, oats, peas) and rotate those.

    I share these examples often...

    [​IMG]

    Strips of brassicas planted in July and winter rye, peas and red clover planted in September

    [​IMG]

    Those same plots ended up feeding 40-50 deer this winter

    [​IMG]

    In the spring the red clover will provide a food source all spring and summer and then is tilled under for brassica.

    You can learn more about all of that in the cereal grain thread but winter rye and peas are another awesome attractant to use along side strips of brassicas.

    The problem you will be faced with when planting sugarbeets is weed control because they need to be planted in the spring. There are some herbicides available but you would need to budget for that expense that one doesn't have to worry about with short season brassicas like rape and turnips.

    If deer eat your brassica forage before fall they may also decimate the beet tops in which case they will never produce a sizable root.

    Just some things to consider if you decide to give them a try...;)
     
  21. dbltree

    dbltree Super Moderator

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    RR sugarbeet seed will not be available this year but there other alternatives.

    ND Weed Guide

    Weed Control Guide for Sugarbeets

    Sugarbeet Integrated Weed Management

    Clethodim is perhaps the most effective way to control post-emergence grasses like foxtail and Dual Magnum II can be applied at that time to keep grass from returning.

    Planting sugarbeets into killed winter rye will also help control small seeded weeds and it is very effective if the rye mulch is left on the soil surface and the beet seed no-till planted.

    As with any crops, rotating and making use of natural weed control by utilizing crops with allelopathic chemical affects will be helpful.

    Frigid Forage has SB seed for 1/2 price at $1.50 a pound but if anyone knows of a better/less expensive source please post a link!

    Sugarbeet seed

    Eventually the courts will resolve the RR seed issue but that could be several years and understanding conventional herbicides will allow you to still grow sugarbeets...:way:<!-- InstanceBeginEditable name="SciName" --><!-- InstanceEndEditable -->
     

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