• Dear User,

    We had issues in getting your old password work with the new version of the software, henceforth kindly Reset Your Password here

    You won't be able to login with your old password

    If you do not receive the Password reset request within a few minutes, please check your Junk / Spam E-mail folder just in case the email got delivered there instead of your inbox. If so, select Not Junk, which will allow future messages to get through.

    If you still need assistance, email [email protected]

    We appreciate your patience and understanding on this matter.

Rous14

Member
I would just mow it and see how that works........but I don't see any clover under it hard to tell from a picture.
Yea those pics were taken kinda off to the edge of my clover plot where the stuff is so thick so thought it would be better picture that way to identify it. It’s definitely spreading in to my clover plot though, and trying to take over. I mowed it once and it came right back. Hit it w whitetail institutes broadleaf killer last weekend (slay I believe it’s called) after I mowed it, not sure that will do any good either.
 

Rous14

Member
Mowing that stuff seems to make it take off more , herbicide for sure . I tried buytrac at the highest does and it wilted it but didn’t kill it , stuff grows up apple tree cages like mad . Also tilling it will cause a mess in the tiler ..


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Yes it does, very viney and climbs easily. I was just told it’s called weedy Japanese Hops. Invasive and hard to kill. Non select herbicide like gly but still reading on other herbicide control products.
 

Sligh1

Administrator
Staff member
That’s a tough one!! You want to start over or try and rescue it? I see 2 viable options here in ur case. Like Jbohn & massive butyrac rate may.... might help. Could go extremely heavy rate of 2,4-d-b (butyrac) with ams. & would want to mow a few days later. Or- we’re likely talking a massive Gly + ams bomb & maybe even regular 2,4-d ester so it all gets knocked out... reseed after about a week or two. Wouldn’t be much clover for this season so I’m guessing ur goals may be rescue it?
 

Rous14

Member
Mowing that stuff seems to make it take off more , herbicide for sure . I tried buytrac at the highest does and it wilted it but didn’t kill it , stuff grows up apple tree cages like mad . Also tilling it will cause a mess in the tiler ..


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Yes it does, very viney and climbs easily. I was just told it’s called weedy Japanese Hops. Invasive and hard to kill. Non select herbicide like gly but still reading on other herbicide control products.
That’s a tough one!! You want to start over or try and rescue it? I see 2 viable options here in ur case. Like Jbohn & massive butyrac rate may.... might help. Could go extremely heavy rate of 2,4-d-b (butyrac) with ams. & would want to mow a few days later. Or- we’re likely talking a massive Gly + ams bomb & maybe even regular 2,4-d ester so it all gets knocked out... reseed after about a week or two. Wouldn’t be much clover for this season so I’m guessing ur goals may be rescue it?
Rescue it. I screwed up by not taking pics of the actual plot. The pics I posted were along the edge of my plot where this stuff is super thick. In my plot I actually have a pretty decent stand of clover BUT this stuff has worked its way out in to about a 1/3 of the plot and is choking out the clover for sure. So I’m thinking of trying one of your concoctions to nuke the stuff along the edge, maybe that will help keep the spreading down some. I just have a 20gall atv sprayer, what would be your mix rate would u suggest?
 

Sligh1

Administrator
Staff member
It all depends on Acres ur sprayer covers. If 20 gallons covers 1 acre- 2-3 qts of Gly & few pounds of ammonium sulfate. I’d spray the bad stuff with that & interseed more clover anytime after. The rest that’s good- keep that junk out. Use some butyrac on clover that has light broadleaf pressure if needed.
 

Rous14

Member
It all depends on Acres ur sprayer covers. If 20 gallons covers 1 acre- 2-3 qts of Gly & few pounds of ammonium sulfate. I’d spray the bad stuff with that & interseed more clover anytime after. The rest that’s good- keep that junk out. Use some butyrac on clover that has light broadleaf pressure if needed.
Gotcha. Typically when killing stuff off w gly I put some crop oil or surfactant in the tank w it. Is this what the ammonium sulfate acts as or should I do that in addition to?
 

Sligh1

Administrator
Staff member
Gotcha. Typically when killing stuff off w gly I put some crop oil or surfactant in the tank w it. Is this what the ammonium sulfate acts as or should I do that in addition to?
For this- splitting hairs. Kinda same reason. Crop oil acts as a “sticky agent” as one reason. Ams will Also aid in breaking down waxy coating allowing plant to uptake the herbicide - making it far more potent & effective. They both have other benefits (reduced drift, hard water improvement with herbicide effectiveness, etc). Both or either is just fine. Can get ams liquid as well & other options that accomplish the same goal. My only reason for mentioning these additives - I am treating what u got in the “hard to kill category” - I may be wrong but I’d rather be sure & kill it “too dead” vs not killing it. “too dead” means maybe u spent a little extra $. Not Killed is a disaster or problem u don’t want.
 

Rous14

Member
For this- splitting hairs. Kinda same reason. Crop oil acts as a “sticky agent” as one reason. Ams will Also aid in breaking down waxy coating allowing plant to uptake the herbicide - making it far more potent & effective. They both have other benefits (reduced drift, hard water improvement with herbicide effectiveness, etc). Both or either is just fine. Can get ams liquid as well & other options that accomplish the same goal. My only reason for mentioning these additives - I am treating what u got in the “hard to kill category” - I may be wrong but I’d rather be sure & kill it “too dead” vs not killing it. “too dead” means maybe u spent a little extra $. Not Killed is a disaster or problem u don’t want.
Agreed. Thanks for the info!
 

BearCreek

New Member
Anyone ever established an annual clover plot that would reseed itself? Craig Harper suggests that this can be accomplished with Crimson, Arrowleaf, Berseem, ect. by letting the clovers go to seed. My thought was to use Crimson, Frosty Berseem, and Balansa in West Central Illinois. Has anyone been successful in getting annual clovers to successfully reseed themselves in areas this "far" north?
 

Sligh1

Administrator
Staff member
Anyone ever established an annual clover plot that would reseed itself? Craig Harper suggests that this can be accomplished with Crimson, Arrowleaf, Berseem, ect. by letting the clovers go to seed. My thought was to use Crimson, Frosty Berseem, and Balansa in West Central Illinois. Has anyone been successful in getting annual clovers to successfully reseed themselves in areas this "far" north?
Yep. Keep grasses under control & like u said- let it go to seed. If u start adding perennials- the annuals will clearly peter-out over time. Do it and post up how it goes over a couple seasons.
 

Tmayer13

PMA Member
Anyone ever established an annual clover plot that would reseed itself? Craig Harper suggests that this can be accomplished with Crimson, Arrowleaf, Berseem, ect. by letting the clovers go to seed. My thought was to use Crimson, Frosty Berseem, and Balansa in West Central Illinois. Has anyone been successful in getting annual clovers to successfully reseed themselves in areas this "far" north?
Im curious on why someone would want this? (Not being controversial at all, honestly just curious)...There are so many better options for a perennial clover plot IMO. Only reason I could see would be it would be a bit more vigorous on growing earlier in the year? But then I would argue that you could get similar results with a perennial clover plot that is done "right" in the spring? Just thoughts that came to mind
 

BearCreek

New Member
I want to incorporate those species into my food plot plan for the for the diversity they add to the landscape. I have rather large diverse plots of perennial clovers and alfalfa in the vicinity so this annual clover plot is more of an addition than a substitute. I agree 100% with your observation, in that I would never prioritize annuals over other perennial offerings, but I think their vigorous growth earlier in the year will be beneficial and something different. It will also be a nice plot to seed with Oats once the clovers die back.
 

Sligh1

Administrator
Staff member
I want to incorporate those species into my food plot plan for the for the diversity they add to the landscape. I have rather large diverse plots of perennial clovers and alfalfa in the vicinity so this annual clover plot is more of an addition than a substitute. I agree 100% with your observation, in that I would never prioritize annuals over other perennial offerings, but I think their vigorous growth earlier in the year will be beneficial and something different. It will also be a nice plot to seed with Oats once the clovers die back.
I like it. So- do a dedicated section to annuals. Watch the deer preference. If it’s next to perennials - be a great comparison. Plots & farming R never-ending experiments!!! First hand observation will change ur thinking & tweak ur plans ongoing. I wanna see how this one turns out!
 

Sligh1

Administrator
Staff member
FROST SEED TIME!!!!! As long as not a lot of snow & not a runny soupy mess.
GO!!!!
New seeding - higher rate. If filling in, lower rates of course & dependent on how much is there & growing. If it’s an exceptional stand, a couple lbs be just fine.
fire away if ?’s on rates & varieties. But - Lil reminder - anytime now is looking good for frost seeding. Probably a 30-40 day window to get this done.
 

BearCreek

New Member
It appears that I may need to install an access road between a crop field and timber edge to access parts of my property. Anyone ever done this and have suggestions as to what to plant? My initial thoughts were some type of perennial clover. Road will run North-South so it will not get very much sunlight in afternoon. Soil should be good as far as fertility and PH. This space would probably be driven over twice a week. Being this close to row crops would also mean it would be subject to some herbicide overspray.
 

BearCreek

New Member
Approximately two weeks ago I seeded Red Clover (Persist) and White Clover (Renovation) on bare dirt. The soil was wet but frozen that morning so I was confident it would get proper soil contact. The soil received about .5 inch rain within a few days. I noticed some, especially the Red Clover, was germinating after about seven days. However, since that time we have had high winds every day and warmer temperatures, the soil surface is extremely dry and cracking. Just wondering if I should count the clover as done and try again before the weeds take over or wait until late summer?
 

Tmayer13

PMA Member
Approximately two weeks ago I seeded Red Clover (Persist) and White Clover (Renovation) on bare dirt. The soil was wet but frozen that morning so I was confident it would get proper soil contact. The soil received about .5 inch rain within a few days. I noticed some, especially the Red Clover, was germinating after about seven days. However, since that time we have had high winds every day and warmer temperatures, the soil surface is extremely dry and cracking. Just wondering if I should count the clover as done and try again before the weeds take over or wait until late summer?
I would bet you are fine...if it germinated then the little roots will find the moisture that's still in the soil. I would also say it's still way too early to tell if you had any sort of failure. Ride it out for another month or so and reevaluate then

Sent from my moto g power using Tapatalk
 

Obsessed

Well-Known Member
I've tried to establish alfalfa 3 different times and a perennial food plot mix once or twice (can't recall) over the past couple of years. I had a bunch of grass and weeds in my pasture last year, so I mowed it frequently. The clover seemed to really get a good foot hold toward the end of the growing season last year and I feared the harsh winter would have killed it off. Nope! It was back strong this spring. I threw down some urea and after the recent rains, I've got an absolute explosion of lush green clover now. My question is, can you bale clover, and if so, does it store well? I've got a couple of alpacas that eat grass hay in the winter, and if I can feed them clover bales, I'll save a few bucks this year. Thanks, in advance. Obsessed
 

IowaBowHunter1983

Super Moderator
Staff member
I've tried to establish alfalfa 3 different times and a perennial food plot mix once or twice (can't recall) over the past couple of years. I had a bunch of grass and weeds in my pasture last year, so I mowed it frequently. The clover seemed to really get a good foot hold toward the end of the growing season last year and I feared the harsh winter would have killed it off. Nope! It was back strong this spring. I threw down some urea and after the recent rains, I've got an absolute explosion of lush green clover now. My question is, can you bale clover, and if so, does it store well? I've got a couple of alpacas that eat grass hay in the winter, and if I can feed them clover bales, I'll save a few bucks this year. Thanks, in advance. Obsessed
I have heard of people bailing clover (Specifically Lee Lakosky). You just need a very large field to make it work because you just don't get the tonnage off it and it dries down (shinks) alot.

Also.... I think I would be focusing on P&K on your clover..... shouldn't need any urea.
 
Top Bottom