Roundup Ready Corn & Soybean Food Plot

Discussion in 'Dbltree's corner' started by dbltree, Jan 17, 2006.

  1. goatman

    goatman I hunt days ending in Y

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    Muddied in

    Never did dry out so in it went. I will be adding turnips into this the end of July. So I'll have a crop of something. I'm getting GPS next year and just sit back and watch it plant.

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  3. Central Iowa

    Central Iowa Administrator

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    oh wow that looks like work!
     
  4. Sligh1

    Sligh1 Administrator Staff Member

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    1) How long would it take you to plant an acre of corn with that?

    2) Guys asking about Beans on Beans..... 2 Years of different types of beans (different brand or #) is all I will do. Could you do 3, sure, probably. What folks often don't realize... You are setting yourself up for some nasty disease with consecutive bean plantings. Fungus for example. Some guys go with some fungicides to combat this but it's still not a good idea. Corn to bean to corn to bean rotation is in place for very good reason. Beans are much riskier to do year after year VS corn. You could essentially (in a bad case) make your ground screwed for future beans for a long time if you did it too long. 2 years is ok, 3 years is risky (I've done it on rare occasion), 4 years, no way, I would never do it. I'll do 2 max. Other downsides to beans on beans..... Erosion is worse. Weeds, etc (good call on Liberty beans). Beans fix N, corn eats it up the following year and keep many diseases out. Hope that answers previous questions. Do some sort of rotation and don't risk pushing the limits on beans. Another option on a rotation is rotating out a Dbltree mix after beans, like turnips/radishes (which will utilize N as well) or the grain mix.
     
  5. goatman

    goatman I hunt days ending in Y

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    Camera makes it look bigger. Only 1/4 acre. About a hour. Would have been faster but half in wet soil. Didn't do very good where there was some clover residue.
     
  6. HorseDoctor

    HorseDoctor PMA Member

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    Ha! And I thought I was the only one nuts enough to do that. :rolleyes: I had one corn cup that either was not engaged or malfunctioning so when I planted a little over half acre of corn, every 4th row failed to come up. I did exactly the same thing with the same "high tech" garden planter and replanted those rows. At least now all I have are some crooked rows but don't have to explain the empty ones. :D
     
  7. goatman

    goatman I hunt days ending in Y

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    You can get more corn in a crooked row. Population will be all over the place with large flats, round, and small flats seed. But it was free.
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2015
  8. Horncarver

    Horncarver Member

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    Late summer soybeans with crimson clover

    I am wanting to plant a small (1/4 acre) early season attraction plot in close proximilty to what I consider one of my "destination plots." I have access to a lot of free soybean seed this fall and was considering mixing in crimson clover to extend the fall attractiveness of the plot in case the deer wipe out the beans right away. Has anyone tried mixing these two or have a better idea of what might compliment the beans? I do not want to establish a perennial clover plot, as I already have that in place. Thanks
     
  9. Sligh1

    Sligh1 Administrator Staff Member

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    No wrong answer if u can get seed rates right where one plant does not smother and shade out others. Early season plot- I'd add some seed for residual into NOv as it will be just as attractive Early season too. I'd get creative as it will work.... Soybeans, lower rate of iron clay or cow peas (die at frost, grow quick & deer love em in October but they shade out other stuff so plant light. And they cheap & common). Austrian winter peas (good for ur goals and good later just for bonus). I'd do clover like Crimson, berseem or balansa cause grow fast & cheap. Last- if wanna get fussy- could add .5-1 lbs to acre of radish. This right here would be a ridiculous early season plot.
     
  10. LoessHillsArcher

    LoessHillsArcher Well-Known Member

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    Anyone broadcasting cover crops into their beans yet? We typically wait a couple more weeks until the beans start to turn but we have one plot that the deer have hammered and the beans haven't canopied as well so I broadcasted some stuff in there
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    Lots of bare, exposed soil so I broadcasted rye, peas, and groundhog forage radishes. We ended up getting nearly 4" of rain in the few days following planting so this seed should hopefully be able to sprout and grow right away
    [​IMG]

    I broadcasted it all through the entire plot. Some of the rows have canopied but lots of areas the deer have browsed so much they never canopied so I feel like it was safe to overseed this bean plot. Now some of our other bean plots that are super tall, thick, and fully canopied I'm going to wait a couple more weeks before broadcasting anything into them since the seed will likely get very little sunlight through the dense soybean canopy. It is best to wait to seed closer to when the beans are going to turn yellow.
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  11. mshm99

    mshm99 Pike County Doe shooter

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  12. DeerHunter3

    DeerHunter3 Member

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    Ok, here's the scenario on my soybean food plot.

    I sprayed the plot labor day week and got a good kill on the grass.

    June 11th I went down with the atv and disc, got everything flatted out well and some down to bare dirt.

    In areas where the grass was taller I have excess thatch laying on the surface...

    I broadcast the beans and ran a drag harrow over everything, with that said do you guys think the beans will still produce in areas where the dead grass is on the surface?
     
  13. Hardwood11

    Hardwood11 Trump 2020

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    The dead grass or thatch will often help seed sprout if a good rain comes along.
     
  14. Booner

    Booner Well-Known Member

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    If you had good seed to soil contact you will be fine; actually you will pry find that the beans will do better in those areas because of more moisture and less weed competition. Ground temp determines germination, and it's obviously where it needs to be because of how late it is.
     
  15. arm

    arm Leg

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    I have some corn I put in late that is about 12" tall today. It got 100# actual N before 1"+ rain last weekend. It is completely weed free. Do I have enough time left to produce decent ears? No "knee high by 4th of July" but I'm not harvesting it
     
  16. HorseDoctor

    HorseDoctor PMA Member

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    Depends on when "fall" comes & the maturity date of the corn. Seems iffy to me... I probably woulda done beans that late. Good luck!
     
  17. Oct-Lull

    Oct-Lull Active Member

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    When was it planted? What maturity? Look at average first frost for your area. Heat units can play a role also. Would give you an idea if there is a reason to leave it.
     
  18. arm

    arm Leg

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    Planted June 12th. It didn't take off great with the dry weather. Don't know the maturity, it was left over from the neighbor and I said what the hell. Guessing around 100 day. My other corn plot and beans are on schedule. Southcentral Iowa so mid-Oct frost probably. Is it simple as maturity coming before first frost?
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2016
  19. Iowa_Buckeye

    Iowa_Buckeye Active Member

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    A couple years ago we planted 86 day corn on July 17th. We also planted beans the same day. We did it so late because the field had flooded prior so we gave it a shot. The growing conditions were perfect following planting. The corn ended up with real nice ears. The beans did set pods, but they never filled.
     
  20. Booner

    Booner Well-Known Member

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    All depends what Mother Nature throws you. You figure these hot days if moisture is adequate your corn will move throw its stages much quicker than corn planted in April or May in those regard based off GDUs (takes about 50 units to move through your V stages) however if we get a frost early you can pretty much stop all growth and what you get is what you get. I'd say since your down south your pry in that 103-108 maturity range so as for grain growth your praying for late frost. If your corn tassels and silks your in the game, if not I'd look toward fall green plots if possible come end of August/September as your corn should be tassling by then.
     
  21. arm

    arm Leg

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    Good deal. I'll evaluate end of august. Crazy how the other corn I put in just 8 days prior is shoulder high already. Bottom ground though and more moisture
     

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