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Tmayer13

PMA Member
I have a few clover plots that I am planning to seed this spring (I know fall is best time). As discussed above, I've used rye as a nurse crop for fall seedings, should I do the same for spring clover seeding? Or is there a better nurse crop for spring? Or should I not use a nurse crop this spring? One of the plots is on a hillside and I'm a little worried about erosion so like the idea of a nurse crop that will germinate quickly and hold the soil until the clover kicks off.
Oats would be the nurse crop for spring.
 
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Sligh1

Administrator
Staff member
What is your favorite clover based perennial mix?
Mine is:
Alice white
Ladino
Red
Alsike.

Maybe even in that order. ;). But I usually have all 4 plus an annual like crimson, balansa or berseem.

For a “premix” - “buck on a bag” …. Frigid forage would be my favorite or one of top ones. I end up planting so many acres I buy in bulk but on lower qty’s- a quality BOB blend is just fine IMO.
 

Hardwood11

It is going to be a good fall!
Are you guys still mixing in chicory with your clover on some of your plots? Past experience is they really like that mix!
 

Sligh1

Administrator
Staff member
I frost seeded some into my rye/clover plot. I haven't seen much come up to be honest, pretty disappointed..
Chicory does well with warm temps. Drought tolerant. I’m gonna guess it would be more of a “warm season plant”. 60+ degrees soil temp to get it going. Give it some time & see if comes in. Could add some more now since it’s close to really warming up.
 

IowaBowHunter1983

Super Moderator
Staff member
Rescued these plots from the dead for a client. Clover was sparse and plots were full of grass and weeds. Frost seeded additional clover, sprayed with IMOX, Cleth, Charge SOC, AMS. Starting to look great.


Clover 1.png


Clover 2.png
 

IowaBowHunter1983

Super Moderator
Staff member
U spray all at once I assume? Looks great!
What rate did you spray imox at?
yes tank mixed all 4 listed above. IMOX was at 7 oz per acre. This was my second attempt with IMOX. I tried it last year at 3-4 oz/a and was not impressed at all. The higher rate made a big difference. They say you don't need cleth. I need to run that experiment at the 7 oz/a yet. I had the cleth in as a safeguard. Grass is smoked!
 

Habitat1

PMA Member
yes tank mixed all 4 listed above. IMOX was at 7 oz per acre. This was my second attempt with IMOX. I tried it last year at 3-4 oz/a and was not impressed at all. The higher rate made a big difference. They say you don't need cleth. I need to run that experiment at the 7 oz/a yet. I had the cleth in as a safeguard. Grass is smoked!
Have you tried 24db? Was curious how that compared to imox
 

Bassattackr

Active Member
May 14th, 2022

Rye has bolted in the last couple weeks. Clover that was only "specs" after germinating in early September has now grown up.

Can see why Rye is such a good nurse crop. Provides some additional shade as the days get longer, and warmer.. :cool:

May 14.jpg


A few leaves littering the plot along the wooded edge.

May 14b.jpg
 

Bassattackr

Active Member
June 18th, 2022

Rye left to stand and dry down now has viable seed. Clover a lush carpet now, with excellent growth.

June 18a.jpg


Rye has done its job and left a very clean patch of clover. Not in much of a hurry to do anything with it. With the second week of upper 90s temperatures, its providing much needed shade for the clover stand. With fawns on the ground may just wait until a good rain and mow around Sept 1st.. Do a little experimentation to see if I can get a good amount of it to volunteer.

June 18b.jpg


Gotta be careful I don't leave my new hat out in the field.. :eek:

IW Hat.jpg
 
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