• Dear User,

    We had issues in getting your old password work with the new version of the software, henceforth kindly Reset Your Password here

    You won't be able to login with your old password

    If you do not receive the Password reset request within a few minutes, please check your Junk / Spam E-mail folder just in case the email got delivered there instead of your inbox. If so, select Not Junk, which will allow future messages to get through.

    If you still need assistance, email [email protected]

    We appreciate your patience and understanding on this matter.

Buck Hollow Sporting Goods - click or touch to visit their website Hunterra - Custom Hunting Property Maps

IowaBowHunter1983

Super Moderator
Staff member
Assume since it is Crimson you planted it this spring? If you just terminated it how are your going to deal with the plant matter? Crimp it over, Disk it in, or just seed it when it drys up?
yes I planted it this spring after threat of frost was gone. It was primarily for nitrogen fixation, but also weed suppression, spring/summer food, etc.

I will drill right into it in a couple weeks... if it looks like we are going to get rain. Non issue. It dries out pretty good and drills real nice.
 

Mrc

New Member
I had a ladino clover plot that was five years old. I tilled it under and planted brassicas. Can I go back to clover next year or do I have to wait until 2024.
 

Sligh1

Administrator
Staff member
I had a ladino clover plot that was five years old. I tilled it under and planted brassicas. Can I go back to clover next year or do I have to wait until 2024.
Clover can come back anytime. You can frost seed or seed it in spring 2023- no issues at all!
 

Mrc

New Member
Thanks. I’m going to try frost seeding. I read that brassicas can sometimes cause the clover to not germinate. Any experience with that?
 

Sligh1

Administrator
Staff member
Thanks. I’m going to try frost seeding. I read that brassicas can sometimes cause the clover to not germinate. Any experience with that?
Yes. It can cause issues. Solutions: plant a diverse blend. Like: Alice white, ladino, red, Alsike, etc. Then: seed it heavy!!!! Maybe spend “$25” more per acre by seeding it very thick. It’ll be fine.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Mrc

Mrc

New Member
Yes. It can cause issues. Solutions: plant a diverse blend. Like: Alice white, ladino, red, Alsike, etc. Then: seed it heavy!!!! Maybe spend “$25” more per acre by seeding it very thick. It’ll be fine.
I see a lot of posts recommending numerous clovers in the same plot.I have 4 quarter acre plots.They were all planted in ladino clover purchased at a local co-op. All of them made it four or five years.Every year I spot spray with a backpack sprayer any clumps of grass or other weeds. I have sprayed 1/2 strength roundup on a couple of plots for grass. Worked good. Mow once a year.Fertilize twice year.Frost seed every spring any bad spots.What is the advantage of mixing four or five different clovers?
 

Sligh1

Administrator
Staff member
I see a lot of posts recommending numerous clovers in the same plot.I have 4 quarter acre plots.They were all planted in ladino clover purchased at a local co-op. All of them made it four or five years.Every year I spot spray with a backpack sprayer any clumps of grass or other weeds. I have sprayed 1/2 strength roundup on a couple of plots for grass. Worked good. Mow once a year.Fertilize twice year.Frost seed every spring any bad spots.What is the advantage of mixing four or five different clovers?
Ladino is a great foundational clover. Same with Alice white
All have pros & cons.

Alice white can tolerate more soils IMO than ladino & IMO- is a slightly more desirable clover vs ladino.
Whites like ladino & Alice do not do as well In dry or heavy heat. Mid summer can be an example of challenging time. Longer lived vs red.

Reds are strong in spring for attractant & also in the heat of the summer when whites are struggling. Seed is cheaper but need more of it since it doesn’t spread with stolons like whites do. Doesn’t live as long as whites. Great N fixer (all are really). Basically- reds will be desired at multiple times a year when others might not be. & it’s simply a sound plan considering deer love browsing from one plant to the next wanting lots of diversity. Reds don’t like wet soil btw.

Alsike is a good cheap clover that does very well in wetter soils. Good amount of browse for deer that has a slightly different look (& I would guess taste) than other clovers.

Diversity is key. U don’t know when or why the deer might be hitting xyz clovers more or less in a mixed plot. It also insures if your soil type isn’t ideal for xyz clover - others can fill in. Or at a time when heat might hurt some types - others can be resilient. Deer + food diversity that include plants high on their preferred list is always better IMO over any plot or choice that’s a monoculture or doesn’t offer diverse choices. Hope that helps.
 

Mrc

New Member
Ladino is a great foundational clover. Same with Alice white
All have pros & cons.

Alice white can tolerate more soils IMO than ladino & IMO- is a slightly more desirable clover vs ladino.
Whites like ladino & Alice do not do as well In dry or heavy heat. Mid summer can be an example of challenging time. Longer lived vs red.

Reds are strong in spring for attractant & also in the heat of the summer when whites are struggling. Seed is cheaper but need more of it since it doesn’t spread with stolons like whites do. Doesn’t live as long as whites. Great N fixer (all are really). Basically- reds will be desired at multiple times a year when others might not be. & it’s simply a sound plan considering deer love browsing from one plant to the next wanting lots of diversity. Reds don’t like wet soil btw.

Alsike is a good cheap clover that does very well in wetter soils. Good amount of browse for deer that has a slightly different look (& I would guess taste) than other clovers.

Diversity is key. U don’t know when or why the deer might be hitting xyz clovers more or less in a mixed plot. It also insures if your soil type isn’t ideal for xyz clover - others can fill in. Or at a time when heat might hurt some types - others can be resilient. Deer + food diversity that include plants high on their preferred list is always better IMO over any plot or choice that’s a monoculture or doesn’t offer diverse choices. Hope that helps.
Thanks for your detailed answers. I read a lot of things in different places and never quite get the whole picture. Read lots of times that deer aren’t attracted to clover after a heavy frost. I know that’s not true!

I’d like to ask one more question. Which brassicas would be the best attractants for Dec. and Jan. I’m in zone 5 in northeast Ohio. I like hunting the later seasons.This year I planted Barkant,Appin,Pasja,and Purple Top. First time planting but I planted too thick.Don’t think I’ll get too much for roots.Are there any that still have green tops in the late season?

Thanks again
 

Sligh1

Administrator
Staff member
Thanks for your detailed answers. I read a lot of things in different places and never quite get the whole picture. Read lots of times that deer aren’t attracted to clover after a heavy frost. I know that’s not true!

I’d like to ask one more question. Which brassicas would be the best attractants for Dec. and Jan. I’m in zone 5 in northeast Ohio. I like hunting the later seasons.This year I planted Barkant,Appin,Pasja,and Purple Top. First time planting but I planted too thick.Don’t think I’ll get too much for roots.Are there any that still have green tops in the late season?

Thanks again
Purple top would be best in Dec & Jan IMO. I don’t mess with others so much so chime in on how they do. Radish are toast by December so that’s a no go.
Earlier planted brassicas like rutabaga & earlier yet- sugar beets would be my other 2 favs for later as far as brassicas go.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Mrc

Bassattackr

Active Member
While red clovers don't last near what perennial clover stands do, I've found them to be prolific reseeders. Thanks to the hard seed they produce, they stay at least as part of the population for me for years. A great company to any perennial mix - Deer love red clover, eating it through winter into spring.
 

Habitat1

PMA Member
I'm contemplating spraying some 2 year old clover with a light gly mix vs buying 24db. I would also broadcast more clover seed as its a fairly light stand that has been getting taken over by mostly broadleaf weeds. I know established clover can take some gly and bounce back, just wasn't sure of others opinions
 

Sligh1

Administrator
Staff member
I'm contemplating spraying some 2 year old clover with a light gly mix vs buying 24db. I would also broadcast more clover seed as its a fairly light stand that has been getting taken over by mostly broadleaf weeds. I know established clover can take some gly and bounce back, just wasn't sure of others opinions
Either way is fine. If it’s clean - u can seed more right into it. On 2,4-d-b, not sure if there’s any plant back interval for clovers. I doubt it & Likely plant immediately but double check. On Gly, clover can tolerate a lot. I’d want enough to kill the problem weeds though. Taller weeds especially are gonna be tough to kill.
Either way- be just fine. Mowing can also be a huge help to pounding broadleaves of course too.
 

Habitat1

PMA Member
Either way is fine. If it’s clean - u can seed more right into it. On 2,4-d-b, not sure if there’s any plant back interval for clovers. I doubt it & Likely plant immediately but double check. On Gly, clover can tolerate a lot. I’d want enough to kill the problem weeds though. Taller weeds especially are gonna be tough to kill.
Either way- be just fine. Mowing can also be a huge help to pounding broadleaves
Thank you. Mowed it all last weekend thinking the spraying will be more effective this weekend. Think I'll try the gly route. Good point on the 24db
 
Thank you. Mowed it all last weekend thinking the spraying will be more effective this weekend. Think I'll try the gly route. Good point on the 24db

Not sure mowing then spraying is the best route. The roots are still the same size. The plant needs to take up the RU and more leaves will help it take in more of the chemical.

I was always told and read to do what you did but if one thinks about how RU works it just doesn’t make sense.
 

Sligh1

Administrator
Staff member
Not sure mowing then spraying is the best route. The roots are still the same size. The plant needs to take up the RU and more leaves will help it take in more of the chemical.

I was always told and read to do what you did but if one thinks about how RU works it just doesn’t make sense.
Good points & thinking.

So, a chemical like clethodim needs more surface area. Thus not mowing is wise as more area for grass to absorb chemical. Plus it’s slow acting & takes while to get into roots. Also why adding crop oil important + higher water volume…. For more surface exposure & thus more plant intake.

Gly is a bit different. In short, where gly is most effective is on: the most actively growing plants. …. Right after mowing when a plant starts to shoot up new green growth & regenerate. Or for grasses, in the reproduction phase when it’s starting seed creation process OR while it’s growing in length at rapid rates far from full maturity. Smaller plants with less area are easier to disrupt & stop photosynthesis- killing the plant easier.

When its least effective is when the plant is clearly not growing or growing the least. Let’s say a “mature grass plant”…. That’s the absolute hardest to kill next to it being dormant. The plants intake is slowed way down. So- very hard to kill. Mature plants= hard to kill, same with dormant plants, even from heat stress or cold. Young plants (smaller, less area ) & vigorously growing …. Easier to kill. Why we also want to spray gly on warmer days vs cooler days.

So- I’d say you’re right to some degree. Depends on herbicide. What we do NOT want to do is: mow & “spray the next day”. We want the plant to put on NEW growth (let’s say it’s been regrowing for 3-4 days for example). But for sure actively growing before we spray.

Just to “get in the weeds” a bit if we dug down on effectively timing & killing weeds…. Tender fresh green growth that’s aggressively growing is the time to nuke it.
 
Last edited:
Good points & thinking.

So, a chemical like clethodim needs more surface area. Thus not mowing is wise as more area for grass to absorb chemical. Plus it’s slow acting & takes while to get into roots. Also why adding crop oil important + higher water volume…. For more surface exposure & thus more plant intake.

Gly is a bit different. In short, where gly is most effective is on: the most actively growing plants. …. Right after mowing when a plant starts to shoot up new green growth & regenerate. Or for grasses, in the reproduction phase when it’s starting seed creation process OR while it’s growing in length at rapid rates far from full maturity. Smaller plants with less area are easier to disrupt & stop photosynthesis- killing the plant easier.

When its least effective is when the plant is clearly not growing or growing the least. Let’s say a “mature grass plant”…. That’s the absolute hardest to kill next to it being dormant. The plants intake is slowed way down. So- very hard to kill. Mature plants= hard to kill, same with dormant plants, even from heat stress or cold. Young plants (smaller, less area ) & vigorously growing …. Easier to kill. Why we also want to spray gly on warmer days vs cooler days.

So- I’d say you’re right to some degree. Depends on herbicide. What we do NOT want to do is: mow & “spray the next day”. We want the plant to put on NEW growth (let’s say it’s been regrowing for 3-4 days for example). But for sure actively growing before we spray.

Just to “get in the weeds” a bit if we dug down on effectively timing & killing weeds…. Tender fresh green growth that’s aggressively growing is the time to nuke it.
Ok. I agree with that but unless a plant is mature it should still be growing. Also, and you touched on this, is there needs to be moisture available to the plant/weed. A plant that is suffering from drought will not take up and get the chemical to the root as effectively as one that is well hydrated.

All if this could also be avoided if we all sprayed when the target weeds are small but life has a way of getting in the way of such things.
 

Sligh1

Administrator
Staff member
Ok. I agree with that but unless a plant is mature it should still be growing. Also, and you touched on this, is there needs to be moisture available to the plant/weed. A plant that is suffering from drought will not take up and get the chemical to the root as effectively as one that is well hydrated.

All if this could also be avoided if we all sprayed when the target weeds are small but life has a way of getting in the way of such things.
Yes. Bingo. When a plant is in drought or lacking moisture it “shuts down”. Plant goes “semi-dormant” & stops growing. For survival. Making it extremely hard to kill.
Ya- big weeds are problem for everyone. Even guys that farm for a living. Let them get too mature - just a battle. When u drive by bean fields with towering pigweed, water hemp, marestail, etc - that’s usually a case in point result of guys not able to spray them on time & weeds get almost unkillable. Thankfully guys can hit hard to kill weeds with enlist 2,4-d in beans where gly just won’t do much. It’ll never be perfect. Thankfully CLOVER is far less fussy & the old fashion mower can solve most issues.
 
Is it too late to seed white clover right now? Better off frost seeding late winter/early spring? I have some fire breaks around new crp and got a fairly poor stand of clover. I just mowed the fire breaks and was wondering if i should broadcast more clover seed now.
 
Top Bottom